INFORMATION

Blog Archives

Professor and Dean Kiyoshi Kita

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD (Pharmacy), Pharmacist

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tmgh.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/about_tmgh/dean

Background

I was educated at Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Tokyo, and gradated in 1980. I joined Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Tokyo as assistant professor (1980 – 1983), and moved to Department of Parasitology, Juntendo University, School of Medicine (1983). Later, I was promoted to lecturer (1987-1990). Then, promoted to associate professor of Department of Parasitology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (1991-1998). In 1998, I was appointed as Professor Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo and retired in 2016. In 2015, I was appointed as Dean of TMGH by cross-appointment system between The University of Tokyo and Nagasaki University.

Teaching

Giving lectures (Biochemistry of metabolism, Drug development and Molecular Parasitology) in Nagasaki University and other Universities.

Research

Biochemistry of metabolism of pathogens and drug development.

The country/countries where you work currently

Japan, Central and South America, Southeast Asia, Africa, USA and Europe.

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. In silico, in vitro, X-ray crystallography, and integrated strategies for discovering spermidine synthase inhibitors for Chagas disease. Yoshino, R., Yasuo, N., Hagiwara, Y., Ishida, T., Inaoka, D.K., Amano, Y., Tateishi, Y., Ohno, K., Namatame, I., Niimi, T., Orita, M., Kita, K., Akiyama, Y. & Sekijima, M. (2017) Sci. Rep. 7, 6666
  2. Expression, purification, and crystallization of type 1 isocitrate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Wang, X., Inaoka, D.K., Shiba T., Balogun, E.O., Allmann, S., Watanabe, Y., Boshart, M., Kita, K. & Harada, S. (2017) Protein Expr. Purif. 138, 56-62
  3. Glycerol kinase of African trypanosomes possesses an intrinsic phosphatase activity. Balogun, E.O., Inaoka, D.K., Shiba, T., Tokuoka, S.M., Tokumasu, F., Sakamoto, K., Kido, Y., Michels, P.A.M., Watanabe, Y., Harada, S. & Kita K.
    (2017) Biochim. Biophys. Acta (General Subjects) 1861, 2830-2842
  4. Biochemical studies of membrane bound Plasmodium falciparum mitochondrial L-malate:quinone oxidoreductase, a potential drug target. Hartuti, E.D., Inaoka, D.K., Komatsuya, K., Miyazaki, Y., Miller, R.J., Xinying, W., Sadikin, M., Prabandari, E.E., Waluyo, D., Kuroda, M., Amalia, E., Matsuo, Y., Nugroho, N.B., Saimoto, H., Pramisandi, A., Watanabe, Y., Mori, M., Shiomi, K., Balogun, E.O., Shiba, T., Harada, S., Nozaki, T. & Kita K. (2018) Biochim. Biophys. Acta (Biogentics) 1859, 191-200.
  5. Ubiquinone binding site of yeast NADH dehydrogenase revealed by structures binding novel competitive- and mixed-type inhibitors. Yamashita, T., Inaoka, D.K., Shiba, T., Oohashi, T., Iwata, S., Yagi, T., Kosaka, H., Miyoshi, H., Harada, S., Kita, K. & Hirano, K. (2018) Sci. Rep. 8, 2427

Message

Contribution from basic research in Japan to the health and wellfare of the people in the world.

Professor of Clinical Medicine Koya Ariyoshi

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

M.D.(Japan), DTM&H (London), MSc Clinical Tropical Medicine (London), PhD (U.K.)

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/internal/nekkennaika.htm

Contact

kari@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

Affiliation(s)

  • Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN)
  • Department of Infectious Diseases, Nagasaki University Hospital
  • School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University
  • Honorary Professor, Clinical Research Department, Faculty of Infectious Tropical Medicine, London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, UK

Background

I had my residency training in internal medicine in Tokyo, 1986-1988. From those days I was interested in working in Africa, which let me do DTMH in London, followed by a post-graduate clinical training in Harare Central Hospital, Zimbabwe, 1989 where I encountered my life work, AIDS. My master project on HIV viral load at LSHTM in 1990 was very successful that I was offered a job as a clinical research fellow at the Jefferiss Wing, St. Mary’s Hospital. My asset of multi-disciplinary human-network has been established when working in London, Oxford and West Africa for 8 years as well as in Tokyo at NIID for 3 years and in Thailand for JICA for 4 years.

Teaching

I am the course director of Master of Tropical Medicine (MTM) where I teach clinical tropical medicine, malaria and non-malaria febrile illness, STD and HIV/AIDS. I also facilitate the tropical infectious disease case discussion.

As a chief of NEKKEN training/education center, I also organize the three-month diploma course of tropical medicine.

Research

HIV research had been a core of my carrier before joining NEKKEN. It broadened my skills to understand a disease from multidisciplinary aspects such as behavioral, epidemiological, clinical science, molecular immunology and virology. Most of my work has derived from clinical-epidemiology settings such as cohort or case-control studies. I enjoy digging out clinical research questions by seeing patients and discussing with medical professionals. On joining to the current group of NEKKEN, my research topic has been broaden toward pneumonia in low, middle and high-income countries, non-malarial febrile illness such as typhus, leptospirosis. Now we have on-going studies in infectious disease wards in North Vietnam, the Philippines and Japan.

ariyoshi_koya_document01Discussing in an overcrowded ward in Bac Mai Hospital, Vietnam with Dr. Thuy, one of the most experienced I.D. physicians.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • The Philippines
  • Vietnam
  • Thailand
  • Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

Hyperlink to the NAOSITE of each paper will be posted if it is “open access”, so that viewers can jump straight to the text of the paper.

  1. Kitashoji E, Koizumi N, Lacuesta TLV, Usuda D, Ribo MR, Tria ES, Go WS, Kojiro M, Parry CM, Dimaano EM, Villarama JB, Ohnishi M, Suzuki M, Ariyoshi K. Diagnostic Accuracy of Recombinant immunoglobulin-like Protein A-Based IgM ELISA for the Early Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in the Philippines. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 9(6): e0003879.(2015)
  2. Morimoto K, Suzuki M, Ishifuji T, Yaegashi M, Asoh N, Hamashige N, Abe M, Aoshima M, Ariyoshi K; Adult Pneumonia Study Group-Japan (APSG-J). The burden and etiology of community-onset pneumonia in the aging Japanese population: a multicenter prospective study. PLoS One. 10(3): e0122247.(2015)
  3. Hamaguchi S, Cuong NC, Tra DT, Doan YH, Shimizu K, Tuan NQ, Yoshida LM, Mai LQ, Duc-Anh D, Ando S, Arikawa J, Parry CM, Ariyoshi K, Thuy PT. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus Among Hospitalized Patients with Acute Undifferentiated Fever in Northern Vietnam. Am J Trop Med Hyg. pii: 14-0806.(2015)
  4. Dhoubhadel BG, Yasunami M, Nguyen HA, Suzuki M, Vu TH, Thi Thuy Nguyen A, Dang DA, Yoshida LM, Ariyoshi K. Bacterial load of pneumococcal serotypes correlates with their prevalence and multiple serotypes is associated with acute respiratory infections among children less than 5 years of age. PLoS One. 31;9(10):e110777.(2014)
  5. M Mori, N Wichukchinda, R Miyahara, A Rojanawiwat, P Pathipvanich, T Maekawa, T Miura, P Goulder, M Yasunami, K Ariyoshi, P. Sawanpanyalert. HLA-B*35:05 is a protective allele with a unique structure amongst HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected Thais, where the B*57 frequency is low. AIDS ; 28(7): 959-67.(2014)

Link to other publications

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/1n5JSXaavr65l/bibliography/48630402/public/?sort=date&direction=ascending

Message

My asset is a human-network developed while working as a AIDS-researcher and a clinician in the UK MRC Laboratories, The Gambia, West Africa for 6 years. I then spent 4 years in Thailand for a JICA-project on HIV/AIDS; since becoming a professor of Nagasaki University, developed various clinical-epidemiology research projects in Vietnam, the Philippines and Japan; also have a role in the infectious disease ward at the University Hospital. Head of center for training/education, NEKKEN; Deputy Dean of the School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health. Message for students: ” if you want to make a substantial impact on health in resource-constrained setting, you should work hard.”

Professor Junko Okumura

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

Pharmacist, MPH (U of Michigan), PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Junko_Okumura

Affiliation(s)

Nagasaki University, Institute of Tropical Medicine (Main work station).

Teaching

Please refer the TMGH Syllabus.

Research

Will be filled later

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Will be filled later
    You might also consider using a PubMed Bibliography Collection as it can be used to easily keep your publications up to date and provide a list of publication references, for example, for your CV or as a web link – please see below.
  • Please refer 6. Research gate.

Message

Fearing that I would regret that I did not accomplish anything, on an impulse I went to work overseas in the field where I realized how much I had to learn. I then entered graduate school at 37 years old and became a late-blooming researcher, despite the fact that I used to hate studying when I was young. To regret doing something or to regret not doing something, the choice is yours. You should find out solutions for development and health by yourself. Textbooks and classes are just tools which provide you with clues.

Professor Satoshi Kaneko

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

M.D.,M.P.H.,Ph.D

Personal/work Web page addresses

Affiliation(s)

  • Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University
  • Visiting lecturer of Tohoku University
  • Visiting scientist of Osaka Kyoiku University

Other titles

  • Associate Editor of Journal of Epidemiology
  • Councilor of Japanese Society of Tropical Medicine
  • JICA Consultant, Sri Lanka Non-communicable disease management project

Background

  • Graduated from the National Defense Medical College, Saitama, Japan in 1990
  • JICA expert in the Tropical Disease Control Project for Chagas disease in Guatemala in 1995
  • Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A in 1997.
  • PhD degree from the Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, JAPAN (UOEH), Kitakyushu, JAPAN in 2001
  • Head of Cancer Surveillance Section, Statistics and Cancer Control Division in National Cancer Center, Tokyo from 2001 until 2005
  • Professor (Fixed-term) at Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University since 2005 to present (Between 2006 and 2010, appointed at Nairobi Research Station, Nagasaki University)
  • Professor at Nagasaki University Graduate School of International Health Development since 2008 to present

Teaching

  • Professor (Fixed-term) at Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University since 2005 to present (Between 2006 and 2010, appointed at Nairobi Research Station, Nagasaki University)
  • Professor at Nagasaki University Graduate School of International Health Development since 2008 to present

Research

  • Development of microsphere-based simultaneous multiple assays and surveillance systems for multiple infectious diseases in Africa.
  • Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in Lao PDR.
  • Epidemiological studies for child health in Kenya.
  • Research on dengue prevention through a residential environmental clean-up program in Sri Lanka.
  • Finding malaria vaccine candidate antigens using microsphere-based simultaneous multiple assays.
  • A scientific approach to community-led total sanitation strategies in Africa.
  • Non-communicable disease (NCD) project by JICA in Sri Lanka.
  • Developing epidemiological data-collection tools using the cutting edge IT technology to monitor health-related problems in developing world; e.g., biometrics (vein authentication) to identify people and link different data sources (link: here)

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Africa
  • Asia

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Shinsugi C, Matsumura M, Karama M, Tanaka J, Changoma M, Kaneko S. Factors associated with stunting among children according to the level of food insecurity in the household: a cross-sectional study in a rural community of Southeastern Kenya. BMC public health 2015; 15(1): 441-51.(2015)
  2. Fujii Y, Kaneko S, Nzou SM, Mwau M, Njenga SM, Tanigawa C, Kimotho J, Mwangi AW, Kiche I, Matsumoto S, Niki M, Osada-Oka M, Ichinose Y, Inoue M, Itoh M, Tachibana H, Ishii K, Tsuboi T, Yoshida LM, Mondal D, Haque R, Hamano S, Changoma M, Hoshi T, Kamo K, Karama M, Miura M, Hirayama K. Serological surveillance development for tropical infectious diseases using simultaneous microsphere-based multiplex assays and finite mixture models. PLoS neglected tropical diseases 2014 Jul; 8(7): e3040.(2014)
  3. Miura M, Tanigawa C, Fujii Y, Kaneko S. Comparison of six commercially-available DNA polymerases for direct PCR. Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo 2013 Nov-Dec; 55(6): 401-6.(2013)
  4. Kaneko S, K’Opiyo J, Kiche I, Wanyua S, Goto K, Tanaka J, Changoma M, Ndemwa M, Komazawa O, Karama M, Moji K, Shimada M. Health and Demographic Surveillance System in the Western and Coastal Areas of Kenya: An Infrastructure for Epidemiologic Studies in Africa. J Epidemiol 2012 Feb 25; 22(3): 276-85.(2012)
  5. Komazawa O, Kaneko S, K’Opiyo J, Kiche I, Wanyua S, Shimada M, Karama M. Are Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets Effective for Preventing Childhood Deaths among Non-Net Users? A Community-Based Cohort Study in Western Kenya. PloS one 2012; 7(11): e49604.(2012)

Message

Learn on site. Everything starts there. What are the problems? What do we need to solve them? In order for us to solve problems, we need “knowledge” and “tools.” We also need to enthusiastically observe and dedicate ourselves to solving problems scientifically. Many of the problems we face do not have ready-made answers. This graduate course aims to establish a mechanism in which knowledge and tools from the “site” are applied to the “academic sphere,” and vice versa. Together, we learn, practice, develop research, and return to practice. Let us embark on our quest for the unknown world!

Professor Yasuhiko Kamiya

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

M.D., M.Trop.Paed., PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Yasuhiko_Kamiya

Affiliation(s)

  • Graduate School of Tropical Medicine & Global Health, Nagasaki University, Japan
  • Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Background

After acquiring MD. from Kochi Medical School in 1985, I worked for children with disability. I acquired Masters in Tropical Paediatrics from Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in 1995, with the dissertation “ Pneumocystis Pneumonia in HIV infected children in Malawi”, and Ph.D. from Faculty of Medicine, University of Liverpool in 2002 with the thesis “Epidemiology and microbiology of acute respiratory infections in children in an urban poor area in Nairobi, Kenya and molecular epidemiology of RS virus”. I joined vaccine trials for pertussis and measles in Ghana. I worked for humanitarian assistance in the former Yugoslavia, the former Zaire, Iraq, Afghanistan, Honduras and South Sudan with AMDA, Peace Wind Japan, UNHCR, and UNICEF. I have consulted and coordinated on community health, health system strengthening, epidemiology on infectious diseases and NCD in Sri Lanka, Kenya, Ghana, Fiji and Philippines and for local capacity development for health system research and epidemiology.

Teaching

I will be teaching Global Health I, Child Health I, Child Health II, Community Health I, and Emergency Assistance I at the TMGH, and also supervising Long Term Internship for MPH course. Currently I am teaching child health and pediatric diseases in MTM and TTM courses, and current epidemiological transition and health system research at the phD Leading program. Previously I taught Overview of Global Health, Child Health, and Emergency Assistance at the Graduate School of International Health Development, along with supervision for long term internship for MPH students.

Research

I have been studying aid effectiveness, particularly on aid fragmentation and its effect on health system. I participated in randomized control trials for several vaccines in Ghana, and did clinical and microbiological (molecular biological) study on RS virus and pneumocystis pneumonia in Malawi, cohort study for ARI in children in Kenya and NCD especially cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Sri Lanka as well as research on referral system in Ghana, and supervision and health information system in Kenya along with overuse of antibiotics, disease replacement under polymicrobial status. I am also engaged in study on access and seeking behavior in children with disability in the Philippines.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Ghana
  • Kenya
  • Honduras
  • Philippines
  • Sri Lanka
  • South Sudan
  • India

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Tsukakoshi T, Samuela J, Rafai EV, Rabuatoka U, Honda S, Kamiya Y, Buerano CC, Morita K. Hepatitis B serologic survey and review of immunization cords of children, adolescents and adults in Fiji, 2008–2009. Virology Journal 2015, 12:36
  2. Kamiya Y. Epidemiology of infectious diseases in Africa in relation to polymicrobial replacement, urbanization, and control measures in health systems. Yves Charbit and Teiko Mishima (Eds.), Questions de migrations et de sante en Afrique Sub-saharienne (Issues of Migrations and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa). Recherches interdisciplinaires en France et au Japan. (pp. 187-213) 2014, Paris: L’ Harmattan.
  3. Masumoto S, Yamamoto T, Ohkado A, Yoshimatsu S, Querri AG, Kamiya Y. Prevalence and associated factors of depressive state among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Manila, the Philippines. International Journal of Tubercle and Lung Disease. 2014. 18 (2) 174-179.
  4. Masumoto S, Yamamoto T, Ohkado A, Yoshimatsu S, Querri AG, Kamiya Y.. Factors associated with health-related quality of life among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Manila, the Philippines. Quality of Life Research 2014 Jun;23(5):1523-1533.
  5. Sasaki E, Kamiya Y*. Caregivers’ Understanding of Pediatric Medication in Central Malawi. J Trop Pediatr. doi: 10.1093/tropej/fmu057 2014.

Message

In development assistance, you must clearly position yourself as to how you support and how much you intervene, while in humanitarian emergency aid, you must make difficult decisions promptly. The more you are involved, the more you realize the hollowness or limits of some approaches to international cooperation, the gap between ideals and reality, and the importance of learning from people in the field. To develop your capability along with those in the field, not necessarily solely for your career development, it is important to learn and un-learn some of what you have studied.

What is taught and learned in the classroom differs from what actually happens and is implemented. Sharing our failures and reflections in the field would be for beneficiaries, not for our carriers. This course offers the chance where we can continue our self-development together, with multifaceted perspectives and a critical regard for ourselves, while being aware of the privilege of mutually teaching and learning.

Professor Christopher Smith

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

MRCP, MRCGP, MSc, PhD, DTM&H (East African Partnership)

Personal/work Web page addresses

https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/aboutus/people/smith.christopher

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-smith-44580610/

Affiliation(s)

  • Graduate School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University
  • Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Background

I have a joint position between the Department of Clinical Research at LSHTM and the graduate school of Tropical Medicine and Global Health (TMGH) at Nagasaki University since September 2017. I have been working at LSHTM since 2014, funded by a Medical Research Council Population Scientist Fellowship. My main area of research is in the field of digital health interventions to support sexual and reproductive health

I completed my PhD titled ‘Increasing contraception use with mobile phone-based interventions’ at LSHTM in 2017 which included a systematic review of mHealth interventions for contraception and the MObile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF) trial in partnership with Marie Stopes International in Cambodia.

Previously I completed the Public Health in Developing Countries MSc at LSHTM in 2011 as part of a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) In-Practice Fellowship based at Imperial College London during 2010-12.

I work as a primary care medical doctor (GP) in London and have worked on an NHS project with Maddox Jolie-Pitt foundation in Cambodia and with Medecins Sans Frontieres in Uganda.

Teaching

I co-organised the Family Planning programmes module (2401) at LSHTM for the last three years and teach at Nagasaki University. I supervise Masters and PhD students.

Research

Interventions delivered by mobile phone (digital/mHealth); sexual and reproductive health; primary care; health partnerships.I am principal investigator on a project to develop an intervention to support reproductive health in Cambodia together with collaborators at SOAS, Kings College London and Marie Stopes International, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).Selected publications can be accessed here in addition to the list below. Please contact me for further information or if you are interested to discuss research or PhD projects.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • United Kingdom
  • Cambodia
  • Philippines

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Kuhlin J, Smith C, Khaemraev A, Tigay Z, Parpieva N, Tillyashaykhov M, Achar J, Hajek J, Greig J, du Cros P, Moore D. The impact of pyrazinamide resistance on multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan. The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. 2018;22(5):544-550
  2. Smith C, Edwards P, Free C. Assessing the validity and reliability of self-report data on contraception use in the Mobile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF) randomised controlled trial. Reproductive Health. 2018;15:50
  3. Smith C, Ngo T, Gold G, Edwards P, Vannak U, Sokhey L, Machiyama K, Slaymaker E, Warnock R, McCarthy O, Free C. Effect of a mobile phone-based intervention on post-abortion contraception: a randomized controlled trial in Cambodia. Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2015.
  4. Smith C, Gold J, Ngo T, Sumpter C, Free C. Mobile phone-based interventions for improving contraception use (Review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;(6)
  5. Smith C, Pettigrew L, Seo H, Dorwood J. Combining General Practice with International work: experiences of UK GPs. J R Soc Med Sh Rep. 2012;3(46):1-9

Message

I am a clinical researcher with interests in different areas and experience of mixed methods research. I have worked as a primary care doctor in the UK and Uganda, where I recently completed the Professional Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H): East African partnership. My research has mainly been on digital health interventions for reproductive health, including a randomised controlled trial in Cambodia. Please contact me for further information or if you are interested to discuss research or PhD projects.

Professor Sharon Cox

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

BSc, MSc, PhD

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/aboutus/people/cox.sharon

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sharon_Cox

Twitter account name

@sharonecox15

Affiliation(s)

School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University, Japan
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK

Background

I graduated from University College London with a BSc. (Biochemistry, First Class Hons) in 1996, followed by a postgraduate teaching qualification (1997), a Masters in Public Health Nutrition at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine [LSHTM] (1998) and finally a PhD, also at LSHTM (2003). My PhD comprised a clinical trial of low-dose maternal vitamin A supplementation to determine effects on immunity to malaria in pregnancy in Ghana. In 2002 I became a staff member at LSHTM within the MRC International Nutrition Group and worked on malaria and anemia in Gambian children. In 2007 I moved to be based in Dar es Salaam Tanzania, working mostly on sickle cell disease. In 2015 I was appointed as a Professor at School of Tropical Medicine & Global Health, Nagasaki University, where I am now based. I also hold a joint appointment at LSHTM.

Teaching

I co-organise courses in Epidemiology and Statistics in semesters 1 and 3 for the TMGH MSc courses. These courses are based on those provided by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine masters programmes and are taught by Nagasaki and visiting LSHTM research staff. I also organise a module on Nutrition for Global Health in Semester 3 and teach individual sessions on in other modules on effects of both under and over-nutrition, diagnosis and management of acute malnutrition, nutrition and infection, causes and effects of anaemia in the tropics, epidemiology and field-based research methodology

Previously at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK I taught and managed units within the MSc in Public Health Nutrition and I have been a tutor on distance based learning MSc courses: “Nutrition and Infection” & “Study Design: writing a grant application.

Research

I am interested in how nutrition underpins human health and in particular in relation to interactions with infections, other conditions like sickle cell disease and maternal and child health. My research aims to provide an evidence base to support nutrition-based interventions to improve health outcomes in populations in low and middle income countries.
Current ongoing studies are summarized below:
Nutrition and TB
I am leading research on nutrition and diabetes in TB patients in the Philippines in both inpatient and outpatient populations in Metro Manila, Cebu and Negros Occidental. I collaborate with investigators from San Lazaro Hospital, Manila, the Nutrition Centre, Philippines and the National TB programme.
Malnutrition in children
In Nepal I am leading research assessing malnutrition in pediatric admissions and outpatient clinics (children of all ages). In Cambodia, we are investigating the determinants of malnutrition of young children within the NHAM birth cohort, with a focus on infections and the microbiome. In Burundi we are collaborating with Action Against Hunger to evaluate malnutrition diagnosis and referral within the integrated community case based management programme (iCCM).
Nutrition as a modulator of sickle cell disease
Within the Muhimbili Sickle Cohort in Tanzania, my previous research has focused on nutritional and genetic modulation of sickle cell disease (SCD).

Disciplines

Epidemiology, Nutrition, Maternal and child health, infectious diseases

Other areas of interest

Nutrition and hypertension/vascular function and role of infections, interactions between diabetes and infections.

The country/countries where you work currently

The Philippines, Nepal, Bangladesh, Cambodia, UK, Japan, Tanzania, Kenya, The Gambia, India

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Lee N, Makani J, Tluway F, Makubi A, Armitage AE, Pasricha SR, Drakesmith A, Prentice AM & Cox SE. Decreased hepcidin levels are associated with low steady-state hemoglobin in children in the Muhimbili sickle cohort, Tanzania. EBioMed, 2018. In press
  2. Cox SE, Ellins EA, Marealle AI, Newton CR, Soka D, Sasi P, Di Tanna GL, Johnson W, Makani J, Prentice AM, Halcox JP & Kirkham FJ. Ready-to-use food supplement +/- arginine & citrulline with daily chloroquine in Tanzanian children with sickle cell disease: a double blind random order cross-over trial. Lancet Hematology, 2018 In press –
  3. Yamanashi H, Kulkarni B, Edwards T, Kinra S, Koyamatsu J, Nagayoshi M, Shimizu Y, Maeda T & Cox SE. Association between atherosclerosis and handgrip strength in non-hypertensive populations in India and Japan. Geriatrics & Gerontology International, in press –
  4. Marealle AI, Siervo M, Wassel S, Bluck L, Prentice AM, Minzi O, Sasi P, Kamuhabwa A, Soka D, Makani J, Cox SE. A pilot study of a non-invasive oral nitrate stable isotopic method suggests that arginine and citrulline supplementation increases whole-body NO production in Tanzanian children with sickle cell disease. Nitric Oxide. 2018 Jan 2;74:19-22. doi: 10.1016/j.niox.2017.12.009. [Epub ahead of print]
  5. Nkya S, Mgaya J, Urio F, Makubi A, Thein SL, Menzel S, Cox SE, Newton CR, Kirkham FJ, Mmbando BP, Makani J. Fetal Hemoglobin is Associated with Peripheral Oxygen Saturation in Sickle Cell Disease in Tanzania. EBioMedicine. 2017 Sep;23:146-149. doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.08.006. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

Link to all publications

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/1tmZEPnoXym/bibliography/40021911/public/?sort=date&direction=decendinga

Message

I propose that nutrition is one of the most important modifiable environmental factors underlying health and disease. Along with infections such as malaria, nutrition has been one of the strongest selection pressures over our recent evolutionary history. This has significant implications in relation to the rapid changes in diet and lifestyle that are occurring globally. Under and over-nutrition are increasingly occurring within the same population groups and in both low and high-income countries.

Nutrition is essential to consider at individual and community/population levels in order to ensure that health interventions are optimally successful.

My research focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which nutritional factors affect health outcomes, with a focus on low- and middle-income country settings and encompassing infectious and non-infectious disease processes.

Professor Masahiro Hashizume

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

MSc, MD, PhD

Personal/work Web page addresses

Affiliation(s)

  • School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University
  • Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University
  • Department of Tropical Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University

Background

I am a physician and an environmental epidemiologist with particular interest in the health impacts of climate change and climate variability. I had my residency training in paediatrics in Tokyo, 1996-1999, then received my master’s degree in international health from Univ. of Tokyo (2001), MSc in Environmental Health and Policy from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) (2003), and PhD from the Univ. of London (LSHTM, 2007). I have served as an advisor or expert for international organizations (e.g., WHO, IPCC), governmental committee (MoE), Editorial Review Board of Environmental Health Perspectives and Editor-in-Chief of Tropical Medicine and Health.

Teaching

I am a co-organizer of “Epidemiology” and “Statistics for Population Health” modules in semester 1 and 3. I also teach individual sessions on a topic of health impacts of climate change for the Global Environment and Health module.

Research

My research interests extend over a range of issues in environmental epidemiology. The current research topics, which we work in collaboration with both the international and Japanese colleagues, focus mainly on health impacts of atmospheric environmental changes including climate variability, global climate change and transboundary and local air pollution in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Ongoing projects include:

  1. Short-term association between ambient temperature (heat, heat extremes and cold) and mortality in Japan and other parts of the world
  2. Effects of ocean-atmosphere interaction phenomenon and local weather on vector-born, water-born and other infectious diseases in tropical and sub-tropical settings
  3. Development of malaria early warning system in Southern Africa
  4. Health effects of long-ranged transported air pollution in the East and Southeast Asia
  5. Respiratory health effects of airborne particulate matter and its chemical compositions and sources

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Bangladesh
  • Japan
  • Kenya
  • South Africa
  • UK
  • Vietnam

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Chung Y, Yang DW, Gasparrini A, Vicedo-Cabrera AM, Ng CFS, Kim Y, Honda Y, Hashizume M. Changing susceptibility to non-optimum temperatures in Japan, 1972-2012: the role of climate, demographic and socio-economic factors. Environ Health Perspect. 2018DOI:10.1289/EHP2546. [Full text]
  2. Kim Y, Gasparrini A, Hashizume M, Honda Y, Ng CFS, Armstrong B. Heat-related mortality in Japan after the 2011 Fukushima disaster: An analysis of potential influence of reduced electricity consumption. Environ Health Perspect. 2017;125(7):077005. doi: 10.1289/EHP493. [Full text]
  3. Nakamura T, Hashizume M, Ueda K, Shimizu A, Takeuchi A, Kubo T, Hashimoto K, Moriuchi H, Odajima H, Kitajima T, Tashiro K, Tomimasu K, Nishiwaki Y. Asian dust and pediatric emergency visits due to bronchial asthma and respiratory diseases in Nagasaki, Japan. J Epidemiol. 2016;26(11):593-601. [Full text]
  4. Imai C, Armstrong B, Chalabi Z, Mangtani P, Hashizume M. Time series regression model for infectious disease and weather. Environ Res. 2015;142:319-327. [Full text]
  5. Gasparrini A, Guo Y, Hashizume M, Lavigne E, Zanobetti A, Schwartz J, et al., Mortality risk attributable to high and low ambient temperature: a multi-country study. The Lancet. 2015;386(9991):369-375. [Full text]

Link to other publications
http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/pediatric/member/Hashizume_2018%20May.pdf

Professor Kazuhiko Moji

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD (Health Sciences), MSc (Health Sciences)

Personal/work Web page addresses

Old record:http://archives.chikyu.ac.jp/archives/AnnualReport/Viewer.do?prkbn=R&jekbn=E&id=98

Research gate or Linked-in account links

http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kazuhiko_Moji

Affiliation(s)

  • Graduate School of Tropical Medicine & Global Health, Nagasaki University, Japan
  • Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University
  • School of Global Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Kyoto, Japan: Professor Emeritus

Background

I graduated from the University of Tokyo (UT) in 1976 (BSc. in Health Sciences) , Then, I was in UT until I am 34 as a research student in the department of human ecology (1976-1978), a master course student (1978-1980), a PhD student (1980-1983), and a research associate (1983-1987). I joined to Nagasaki University in 1987, as an associate professor of public health at School of Medicine, then as a professor of community health at School of Allied Medical Sciences in 1999. From 2002, I moved to Nekken, Institute of Tropical Medicine as a professor at the Research Center for Tropical Infectious Diseases (RECTID). Between 2007 and 2013, I was in Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Kyoto, as a project leader of “The RIHN Ecohealth project: Environmental Change and Infectious Diseases in Tropical Asia. After the RIHN Ecohealth project, I joined again to Nagasaki University, being professor and dean of the graduate school of international health development, which is the precursor of this graduate school of tropical medicine and global health.

Teaching

Based on my back ground of human ecology, I will be teaching various aspects of bio-social approach to global health. Bio-medical science and epidemiology are very important part of global health. Yet, students need to acquire enough knowledge on wider bio-social context of each society which is shaping the health of the people, in order to contribute to the sustainable development goals of global health. Students need to understand people’s life, their environments, their society’s history, culture, social and political system, public health systems and so on. I will teach the following modules: Global Health in the autumn quarter, Health Promotion Ⅰand Ⅱ in the winter quarter. And I will serve as an organizer/coordinator for Health System and Policy Ⅰand Ⅱ, and Social Entrepreneurship.

Research

I have been studying human ecology of people living in various environments in Asia, Africa and South America. Based on intensive field work in rural communities, I studied demographic events (death, pregnancy, birth and in/out migration), time-allocation of human activities, their interaction with environment, food acquisition, diet, energy and nutrient intake, and energy output. Then, I started to study health ecology of parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis haematobium in Kenya, malaria in Indonesia and Lao P.D.R. and liver fluke infection in Lao P.D.R. I have been interested in ecohealth/human ecology approaches (non-pharmaceutical approaches) to reduce the burden of these parasitic diseases and to accelerate health transition.

The country/countries where you work currently

Currently: Lao P.D.R, and Indonesia
In the past: Japan, Kenya, Bolivia, Bangladesh, China, and Vietnam

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Density dependence in a seasonal time series of the bamboo mosquito, Tripteroides bambusa (Diptera: Culicidae) Hoshi, T., Imanishi, N., Moji, K., Chaves, L.F. 2017 Canadian Entomologist 149(3), pp. 338-344
  2. The role of domestic dogs in the transmission of zoonotic helminthes in a rural area of Mekong river basin Sato, M.O., Sato, M., Yoonuan, T., (…), Moji, K., Waikagul, J. 2017 Acta Parasitologica 62(2), pp. 393-400
  3. Application of environmental DNA analysis for the detection of Opisthorchis viverrini DNA in water samples Hashizume, H., Sato, M., Sato, M.O., (…), Moji, K., Minamoto, T. 2017 Acta Tropica 169, pp. 1-7
  4. Household clustering of asymptomatic malaria infections in Xepon district, Savannakhet province, Lao PDR Pongvongsa, T., Nonaka, D., Iwagami, M., (…), Mita, T., Kano, S. 2016 Malaria Journal 15(1),508
  5. Morbidity assessment of Opisthorchis viverrini infection in rural Laos: I. Parasitological, clinical, ultrasonographical and biochemical findings Feldmeier, H., Hazay, M., Sato, M., (…), Sopraseuth, V., Moji, K. 2016 Tropical Medicine and Health

Link to all publications

For other publication

Message

The world is full of contradictions and irrationalities. Imagine you come from a poor African or tropical Asian family. How would you avoid disease and survive? What would you eat? What would you do to stay alive? If you had no schooling and were illiterate, would you be able to live despite society’s disdainfulness? The starting point in international health development is saying to yourself, “for those people in poor countries, living itself is already a great achievement. As for me, who live in a blessed environment, what am I doing to make a difference?” Our answer is that we can learn and think, developing ourselves as useful human resources and take up our responsibilities according to our capacity. To achieve this goal, I will strive to make the School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health a meaningful place for education, research, and practice, together with the faculty and students.

Professor Katsuyuki Yui

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

M.D., Ph.D.

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.med.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/mmi/im/

Affiliation(s)

Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Background

Education

  • 1975-81    Shinshu Univ. Sch. Med.
  • 1981-85    Graduate School of Medicine, Ph.D.

Work

  • 1985-88    Postdoctoral fellow, Dept. Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Univ. Pennsylvania
  • 1988         Research Associate. Dept. Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Univ. Pennsylvania
  • 1989-95    Research Assistant Professor, Dept. Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Univ. Pennsylvania
  • 1995-97        Assistant Professor, Dept. Medical Zoology, Nagasaki University
  • 1997-2002    Professor, Dept. Medical Zoology & Immunology, Nagasaki University
  • 2002-pres.    Professor, Division of Immunology, Dept. Molecular  Microbiology and Immunology, Nagasaki University

Teaching

Immunology of Infectious diseases

Research

  • The immune system is a powerful defense which protects the host against invasion, growth, and division of the infectious organisms that come from the outside environment. It consists two major systems: innate immunity, which constitutively protects the host against the invasion of microorganisms, and adaptive immunity, which is a highly developed system and can specifically recognize micro-organisms and memorize them. These immune mechanisms co-evolved with the micro-organisms that invade them.
  • Our laboratory works mainly on the T cell-mediated adaptive immune system against infection with malaria parasites.  When infection by malaria parasites, the immune system is modulated, and protection is perturbed, which may be required to prevent damage to the hot due to excessive immune responses.  We have found a novel mechanism of immune regulation during infection by malaria parasites.  Our laboratory is also working on intravital imaging of immune cells during infection by malaria parasites, which enables us to directly visualize the interaction between parasites and the host’s immune system.

The country/countries where you work currently

Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Kimura, D, Miyakoda, M., Kimura K., Honma, K., Hara, H., Yoshida, H., Yui, K.., Interleukin-27-producing CD4+ T cells regulate protective immunity during malaria parasite infection, Immunity, 44: 672-682, 2016.
  2. Akbari, M., Honma, K, Kimura, D., Miyakoda, M., Kimura,K, MatsuyamaT., Yui, K., IRF4 in dendritic cells inhibits IL-12 and controls Th1 immune responses against Leishmania major. J. Immunol., 192 (5): 2271-2279. 2014.
  3. Kimura, K., Kimura, D., Matsushima, Y., Miyakoda, M., Honma, K., Yuda, M., Yui, K., CD8+ T cells specific for a malaria cytoplasmic antigen form clusters around infected hepatocytes and are protective at the liver stage of infection, Inf. Immun. 81 (10) : 3825-3834. 2013.
  4. Closeup: Cross-presentation of malaria antigen by brain microvessels: why CD8+ T cells are critical for the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria.  EMBO Mol. Med. 5 (7):899-901、2013.
  5. Development of memory CD8+ T cells and their recall responses during blood-stage infection with    Plasmodium berghei ANKA. J. Immunol., 189(9):4396-4404. 2012.

Message

Immunology is an important subject in order to understand infectious diseases. One of the biggest achievements in immunology is the development of vaccines, which save millions of people. However, vaccines have not been developed for all infectious diseases. In particular, vaccine development is difficult in chronic infectious diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, all of which are major infectious diseases in tropical regions. You need to understand what makes vaccine development difficult. I look forward to discussing and thinking about these problems together with you.

Associate Professor Daniel Ken Inaoka

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD, Pharmaceutical Sciences

Research gate account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Daniel_Inaoka

Affiliation(s)

Visiting Researcher, Department of Biomedical Chemistry, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo.

Background

I was born and lived 21 years in Brazil, an endemic country for Chagas disease and Leishmaniasis. I studied at the Faculty of Pharmacy from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. In 2000, I came to Japan and under the support of Mombukagakusho Scholarship I obtained Master and PhD degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences at Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo. During my Master and Doctoral course I have analyzed the biochemical and structural biological properties of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a potential drug target from Trypanosoma cruzi involved in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis. In 2005, I moved to Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo supported by Postdoctoral Fellowships for Foreign Researchers (JSPS) to start research in structural biology and drug design targeting the unique energy metabolism found in Trypanosomatids and Helminthes. Since 2007, I become Assistant Professor of Department of Biomedical Chemistry from Graduate School of Medicine at The University of Tokyo to research molecular and biochemical parasitology and drug design targeting enzymes involved in microaerophilic mitochondrial metabolism from protozoan parasites and helminthes. I have expertise in the field of biochemistry, parasite metabolism, structural biology and drug design.

Teaching

I worked as part-time lecturer for practical class in biophysics at Teikyo University, between 2002 and 2005. I was also in charge of practical class in biochemistry at School of International Health, The University of Tokyo, from 2007 to 2016. At TMGH, Nagasaki University, I will be teaching part of Basic Human Biology coordinated by Prof. Kita and Prof. Kamiya.

Research

Based in keywords such as “Parasite”, “Mitochondria”, “Host Environment Adaptation”, “Ubiquinone”, “Energy Metabolism”, “Biochemistry”, “Drug Target” and “Drug Development”, my current research area include Trypanosomatids and Apicomplexan parasites, Helminthes and Tumor Microenvironment.

Differences in the mitochondrial energy metabolism between human (top), P. falciparum (middle), Ascaris suum (left bottom) and T. brucei blood stream forms (BSF). Complex I: NADH dehydrogenase; Complex II: Succinate dehydrogenase; Complex III: Quinol-cytochrome c (Cytc) reductase; Complex IV: Cytochrome c oxidase; Complex V: ATP synthase; SQOR: Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase; DHODH: Dihydroorotate (DHO) dehydrogenase; PRODH: Proline dehydrogenase; G3PDH: Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) dehydrogenase; ETFDH: Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) dehydrogenase; MDH: Malate dehydrogenase; Q: Ubiquinone; QH2: Ubiquinol; NDH2: Type-II NADH dehydrogenase; MQO: Malate:quinone oxidoreductase; RQ: Rhodoquinone; RQH2: Rhodoquinol; AOX: Alternative oxidase; ASCT: Acetate:succinate CoA transferase; SCS: Succinyl-CoA synthethase; CoA: Coenzyme A. Enzymes not conserved in human genome is highlighted in light orange color.

Crystal structure of T. brucei Alternative Oxidase (AOX) in complex with 277-9-OH, an ascofuranone derivative. AOX is a key enzyme in energy metabolism of plants, fungi and T. brucei. It is essential in BSF and required to maintain the redox balance within glycosomes, a Trypanosomatid-specific organelle.

Crystal structure of mitochondrial Quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR or Complex II) from A. suum. This enzyme is a heterotetramer composed by flavoprotein (salmon color), iron-sulfur protein (white), large (purple) and small (orange) cytochrome b subunits. In the small intestine where oxygen concentration is extremely low, this enzyme catalyzes the last step in fumarate respiration and essential for adaptation to host environment. Inhibitors of QFR are active against the helminthes that lives in microaerophilic environment such as adult stage of A. suumHaemonchus contortus, and Dirofilaria immitis.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Indonesia
  • El Salvador

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Hartuti ED, Inaoka DK (Corresponding Author, CA), Komatsuya K, Miyazaki Y, Miller RJ, Xinying W, Sadikin M, Prabandari EE, Waluyo D, Kuroda M, Amalia E, Matsuo Y, Nugroho NB, Saimoto H, Pramisandi A, Watanabe YI, Mori M, Shiomi K, Balogun EO, Shiba T, Harada S, Nozaki T, Kita K. Biochemical studies of membrane bound Plasmodium falciparum mitochondrial L-malate:quinone oxidoreductase, a potential drug target. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2018 Mar;1859(3):191-200.
  2. Wang X, Inaoka DK (CA), Shiba T, Balogun EO, Allmann S, Watanabe YI, Boshart M, Kita K, Harada S. Expression, purification, and crystallization of type 1 isocitrate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Protein Expr Purif. 2017 Oct;138:56-62.
  3. Inaoka DK, Iida M, Hashimoto S, Tabuchi T, Kuranaga T, Balogun EO, Honma T, Tanaka A, Harada S, Nara T, Kita K, Inoue M. Design and synthesis of potent substrate-based inhibitors of the Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Bioorg Med Chem. 2017 Feb 15;25(4):1465-1470.
  4. Inaoka DK (CA), Iida M, Tabuchi T, Honma T, Lee N, Hashimoto S, Matsuoka S, Kuranaga T, Sato K, Shiba T, Sakamoto K, Balogun EO, Suzuki S, Nara T, Rocha JR, Montanari CA, Tanaka A, Inoue M, Kita K, Harada S. The Open Form Inducer Approach for Structure-Based Drug Design. PLoS One. 2016 Nov 28;11(11):e0167078.
  5. Inaoka DK, Shiba T, Sato D, Balogun EO, Sasaki T, Nagahama M, Oda M, Matsuoka S, Ohmori J, Honma T, Inoue M, Kita K, Harada S. Structural Insights into the Molecular Design of Flutolanil Derivatives Targeted for Fumarate Respiration of Parasite Mitochondria. Int J Mol Sci. 2015 Jul 7;16(7):15287-308.

Associate Professor Shingo Inoue

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

Ph.D. (Veterinary Medicine), National License of veterinarian

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/nekken/english/research/virology.html

Affiliation(s)

Department of Virology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (I.T.M), Nagasaki University

Background

  • February 2017: I became an associate professor of Department of Virology, I.T.M.
  • October 2009 to March 2017: I was dispatched to Kenya and work as a JICA expert on Virology (Arboviruses) at the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) for nearly 8 years (JICA-JSPS project and JICA-AMED SATREPS project).
  • December 2001: I joined to the Department of Virology, I.T.M. as an assistant professor.
  • April 1997 to November 2001: I Joined to St. Luke’s Medical Centre as a post-doctoral fellow. (Almost 3 years)
  • April 1997 to March 1999: I joined to the Department of Virology, I.T.M. as a post-doctoral fellow.
  • March 1997: I finished Ph.D. Course and got a degree at the Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Gifu University.
  • April 1989 to July 1991: I was dispatched to Zambia as a member of Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers (JOCV). I joined to the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia for three years.
  • April 1988: I passed the National License Examination for Veterinarian.
  • March 1988: I finished MSc. Course and got a degree at the Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University.

Teaching

  1. Conducting the Virology Student Practices in the Training Course on Tropical Medicine (TTM) and the Master Course on Tropical Medicine (MTM)
  2. Supervising three Ph.D. Course students (two of them have got Ph.D. degrees) and 4 MSc. Course students (two of them have got MSc degrees) in Kenya.
  3. Instructing two Kenyan research students and a D.R. Congo research student on their virology and Molecular Biology essential experiments for preparation of their Ph.D. Course study.

Research

Development of diagnostics for mosquito-borne viral diseases (dengue virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Rift Valley fever virus, chikungunya virus, West Nile virus etc.)

The country/countries where you work currently

Kenya

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Adungo F, Yu F, Kamau D, Inoue S, Hayasaka D, Posadas HG, Sang R, Mwau M, Morita K, Development and Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to yellow fever virus and their application in antigen detection and IgM capture ELISA. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, on line 15 June 2016.1-38 (2016)
  2. Yoshikawa A, Nabeshima A, Inoue S, Agoh M, Morita K, Molecular and serological epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in a remote island of western Japan: an implication of JEV migration over the East China Sea., Tropical Medicine and Health, 44(8): 1-10 (2016)
  3. Inoue, S, Bundi M, Miring’u G, Muriithi B, Ashur S, Wandera E, Kathiiko C, Odoyo E, Kwallah AO, Galata A, Huka S, Shah M, Karama M, Kariuki S, Ichinose Y, Evaluation of a BSL-3 laboratory biosafety training program in Kenya. Journal of Biotechnology and Biosafety, 3(4): 288-296, (2015)
  4. Wasonga C, Inoue S, Rumberia, C,  Michuki, G, Kimotho JH, Ongus J, Sang R, Musila L, Genetic divergence of chikungunya virus plaque variants from the Comoros Island (2005). Virus Genes, 51(3): 323-328 (2015)
  5. Kwallah AO, Inoue S, Thairu-Mwangi AW, Kuttoh N, Morita K, Mwau M. Seroprevalence of Yellow Fever virus in selected health facilities in Western Kenya 2010–2012. Jpn J Infect Dis, 68: 230-234, (2015)

Message

Currently, I am working together with Kenyan students and young researchers for the development of diagnostics for mosquito borne viral diseases in Kenya. The highest priority criterion for me to choose research topics for my students and myself are based on the local needs in the tropics and it is also related to the development of diagnostics.

Associate Professor Vladimir Saenko

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

More than a 30-year experience and hands-on a broad variety of molecular laboratory techniques and instrumentations, experimental design and data analysis, laboratory management, instructorship and supervision.

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www-sdc.med.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/dhrc/index-e.html

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vladimir_Saenko

Affiliation(s)

Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University

Background

Education
1995/01–1996/11, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA1994/06, PhD (biochemistry and immunology), Rostov State Medical Institute, Rostov-on-Don, Russia1981/091987/02, M.S. [equivalent] in chemical engineering of biologically active substances, Lomonosov Institute of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow, Russia
Career

  • 2012/06present, Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology
    Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University
  • 2011/042012/06, Assistant professor, Department of Health Risk Control, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • 2002/042011/03, Assistant professor, Department of International Health and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
  • 2000/05–2002/03, Visiting Professor, Department of International Health and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
  • 1997/052000/04, Senior Scientist Molecular Biology division (Head), Department of Pathology, Medical Radiological research Center of RAMS, Obninsk, Russia
  • 1991/06–1997/04 , Scientist, Department of Radiation Biochemistry, Medical Radiological research Center of RAMS, Obninsk, Russia
  • 1987/031991/05, Junior Scientist, Department of Radiation Biochemistry, Medical Radiological Research Center of RAMS, Obninsk, Russia

Teaching

  • 2013 – present, “Radiation and thyroid cancer” (medical student course), Fukushima Medical University
  • 2006 – 2014, “Molecular Biology, Gene expression, Genomics and Biotechnology” (foreign student course), Nagasaki University
  • 2003 – 2012, “Basics of Molecular Biology” (medical student course) Nagasaki University

Research

Thyroid carcinogenesis, molecular carcinogenesis, radiation-induced carcinogenesis, molecular epidemiology, molecular diagnostics, radiation and cancer epidemiology, radiation biology, human genetics, molecular pathology. An author and coauthor of 117 peer reviewed articles, 2 books, 9 book chapters, 23 Professional societies’ publications, peer review service to 19 international journals, Member of Editorial board in 2 journals.

The country/countries where you work currently

Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Yamashita S, Suzuki S, Suzuki S, Shimura H, Saenko V. Lessons from Fukushima: Latest Findings of Thyroid Cancer after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident. Thyroid 2017 Dec 1. doi: 10.1089/thy.2017.0283. [Epub ahead of print] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28954584
  2. Bogdanova TI, Saenko V, Hirokawa M, Ito M, Zurnadzhy LY, Hayashi T, Rogounovitch TI, Miyauchi A, Tronko MD, Yamashita S. Comparative histopathological analysis of sporadic pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma from Japan and Ukraine. Endocr J 2017, 64(10):977-993. doi: 10.1507/endocrj.EJ17-0134. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/endocrj/64/10/64_EJ17-0134/_pdf/-char/en
  3. Matsuse M, Yabuta T, Saenko V, Hirokawa M, Nishihara E, Suzuki K, Yamashita S, Miyauchi A, Mitsutake N. TERT promoter mutations and Ki-67 labeling index as a prognostic marker of papillary thyroid carcinomas: combination of two independent factors. Scientific Rep 2017, 7:41752 doi: 10.1038/srep41752. PMID: 28150740. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5288691/
  4. Nikitski A, Rogounovitch T, Bychkov A, Takahashi M, Yoshiura K, Mitsutake N, Kawaguchi T, Matsuse M, Drozd V, Demidchik Yu, Nishihara E, Hirokawa M, Miyauchi A, Rubanovich A, Matsuda F, Yamashita S, Saenko V. Genotype analyses in the Japanese and Belarusian populations reveal independent effects of rs965513 and rs1867277 but do not support the role of FOXE1 polyalanine tract length in conferring risk for papillary thyroid carcinoma. Thyroid 2017, 27(2):224-235. doi: 10.1089/thy.2015.0541. http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/thy.2015.0541
  5. Takamura N, Orita M, Saenko V, Yamashita S, Nagataki S, Demidchik Yu. Radiation and risk of thyroid cancer: Fukushima and Chernobyl. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2016, 4(8):647. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213858716301127?via%3Dihub

Message

We are aimed at designing and conducting laboratory and epidemiological research into the contribution of inherited genetic variations and somatic genetic alterations to the etiology of human cancer and non-cancer diseases, particularly focusing on populations exposed to radiation in Chernobyl, Kazakhstan and Japan to improve public health through gaining new insights into gene-environmental interactions.

Associate Professor Chris Fook Sheng Ng

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

BSc, MAppStats, PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1025-0807
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Chris_Fook_Sheng_Ng
Contact Chris at https://tinyurl.com/yc3chlms

Affiliation(s)

School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University, Japan

Background

Chris received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (USA) (2002), a Master of Applied Statistics with distinction from the University of Malaya (Malaysia) (2005), and a PhD in Health Science from the University of Tokyo (Japan) (2011) for research on statistical method to measure the relative performance of post-market treatments in the absence of suitable controls. Following completion of his PhD, he went on to hold a postdoctoral position at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan) where he studied the health effects of ambient temperatures and air pollution in Japan. In 2013, he became a postdoctoral fellow under the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and expanded his work on environmental pollution and health to the developing countries in the tropics. He continued his work as an assistant professor at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University (Japan), from late 2015 until early 2018. From April 2018, he joined the School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health at the same university as an Associate Professor. He was a Rutherford Fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (United Kingdom) between August 2018 to January 2019.

Teaching

Chris teaches biostatistics at the School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health at Nagasaki University, and previously, the School of International Health at the University of Tokyo. He has previously organized and taught undergraduate courses in statistics, actuarial mathematics, and quantitative analysis.

Research

Chris is interested in environmental epidemiology and the related statistical methods. His research focuses on the assessment of human health risk associated with atmospheric exposures such as air pollution, ambient temperatures, airborne pollen, and intercontinental dust events. He is currently leading a project to measure the health impacts of landscape fires that affect the air quality of many Southeast Asian cities. He is involved in a project that investigates the associations of fine particulate matter, its chemical constituents and sources with the lung function of asthma patients. He is also leading a study to examine the forward displacement of daily mortality attributable to air temperatures in tropical setting.

Given his extensive training in applied statistics, Chris is also interested in the application of statistics in a multidisciplinary context involving other health fields and looks forward to working with researchers from different backgrounds.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Philippines
  • Vietnam

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Ng CFS, Boeckmann M, Ueda K, Zeeb H, Nitta H, Watanabe C, Honda Y. Heat-related mortality: effect modification and adaptation in Japan from 1972 to 2010. Global Environmental Change. 2016; 39: 234-243.
  2. Ng CFS, Stickley A, Konishi S, Watanabe C. Ambient air pollution and suicide in Tokyo, 2001-2011. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2016; 201: 194-202.
  3. Konishi S, Ng CFS, Stickley A, Nishihata S, Shinsugi C, Ueda K, Takami A, Watanabe C (2014). Particulate matter modifies the association between airborne pollen and daily medical consultations for pollinosis in Tokyo. Science of the Total Environment. 2014; 499: 125-132.
  4. Ng CFS, Ueda K, Takeuchi A, Nitta H, Konishi S, Bagrowicz R, Watanabe C, Takami A. Socio-geographic variation in the effects of heat and cold on daily mortality in Japan. Journal of Epidemiology. 2014; 24(1): 15-24.
  5. Ng CFS, Ueda K, Ono M, Nitta H, Takami A. Characterizing the effect of summer temperature on heat-stroke-related emergency ambulance dispatches in the Kanto area of Japan. International Journal of Biometeorology. 2014; 58(5): 941-948.

Message

In the digital age where data are collected faster and greater in quantity, strong quantitative skills are important to allow one to extract useful information from data. Statistics is central to this process. As you begin your journey with us, there will be opportunities to gain knowledge in statistical inference and develop skills in data analysis and interpretation. You will also be exposed to the data-driven approaches in epidemiology. I look forward to meeting students and researchers interested in utilizing these skills to improve health.

Associate Professor Ken Masuda

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD in Social Anthropology

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.linkedin.com/pub/ken-masuda/27/763/a83

Affiliation(s)

School of Global Humanities and Social Sciences, Nagasaki University

Background

Socio-anthropological study on history, socio-cultural dynamics, inter-ethnic conflict, modernization and development among the Banna in southern Ethiopia since 1993. Study on medical anthropology and medical pluralism since 2008. Study on population aging and elderly care since 2012.

Teaching

  • Teaching medical anthropology at TMGH and supervising master thesis at the International Health Development program. My students have carried out researches in Ethiopia, Kenya, Burkina Faso, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Cambodia.
  • Teaching Environmental anthropology at the Faculty of Environmental Studies and African Study at the School of Global Humanities and Social Sciences.

Research

I am currently involved in research teams on global aging, especially focusing on future aging and social welfare in Africa. Both qualitative and quantitative research on elderly life, health, care and social protection will be carried out in East Africa; Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Ethiopia (1993-Now)
  • Kenya (2012-Now)
  • Tanzania (2015-Now)
  • Nagasaki (2004- Now)

Message

I have been carrying out anthropological fieldwork on tradition and the modernization process in an agro-pastoral society, the Banna, in Ethiopia, northeast Africa since 1993. Watching a small remote society connect with, and getting swallowed by globalization reveals both positive and negative aspects of “development”. I explore the ideal relationship between traditional culture and society, modernization and development through the anthropological approach to international healthcare.

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