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Associate Professor Daniel Ken Inaoka

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD, Pharmaceutical Sciences

Research gate account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Daniel_Inaoka

Affiliation(s)

Visiting Researcher, Department of Biomedical Chemistry, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo.

Background

I was born and lived 21 years in Brazil, an endemic country for Chagas disease and Leishmaniasis. I studied at the Faculty of Pharmacy from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. In 2000, I came to Japan and under the support of Mombukagakusho Scholarship I obtained Master and PhD degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences at Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo. During my Master and Doctoral course I have analyzed the biochemical and structural biological properties of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a potential drug target from Trypanosoma cruzi involved in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis. In 2005, I moved to Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo supported by Postdoctoral Fellowships for Foreign Researchers (JSPS) to start research in structural biology and drug design targeting the unique energy metabolism found in Trypanosomatids and Helminthes. Since 2007, I become Assistant Professor of Department of Biomedical Chemistry from Graduate School of Medicine at The University of Tokyo to research molecular and biochemical parasitology and drug design targeting enzymes involved in microaerophilic mitochondrial metabolism from protozoan parasites and helminthes. I have expertise in the field of biochemistry, parasite metabolism, structural biology and drug design.

Teaching

I worked as part-time lecturer for practical class in biophysics at Teikyo University, between 2002 and 2005. I was also in charge of practical class in biochemistry at School of International Health, The University of Tokyo, from 2007 to 2016. At TMGH, Nagasaki University, I will be teaching part of Basic Human Biology coordinated by Prof. Kita and Prof. Kamiya.

Research

Based in keywords such as “Parasite”, “Mitochondria”, “Host Environment Adaptation”, “Ubiquinone”, “Energy Metabolism”, “Biochemistry”, “Drug Target” and “Drug Development”, my current research area include Trypanosomatids and Apicomplexan parasites, Helminthes and Tumor Microenvironment.

Differences in the mitochondrial energy metabolism between human (top), P. falciparum (middle), Ascaris suum (left bottom) and T. brucei blood stream forms (BSF). Complex I: NADH dehydrogenase; Complex II: Succinate dehydrogenase; Complex III: Quinol-cytochrome c (Cytc) reductase; Complex IV: Cytochrome c oxidase; Complex V: ATP synthase; SQOR: Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase; DHODH: Dihydroorotate (DHO) dehydrogenase; PRODH: Proline dehydrogenase; G3PDH: Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) dehydrogenase; ETFDH: Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) dehydrogenase; MDH: Malate dehydrogenase; Q: Ubiquinone; QH2: Ubiquinol; NDH2: Type-II NADH dehydrogenase; MQO: Malate:quinone oxidoreductase; RQ: Rhodoquinone; RQH2: Rhodoquinol; AOX: Alternative oxidase; ASCT: Acetate:succinate CoA transferase; SCS: Succinyl-CoA synthethase; CoA: Coenzyme A. Enzymes not conserved in human genome is highlighted in light orange color.

Crystal structure of T. brucei Alternative Oxidase (AOX) in complex with 277-9-OH, an ascofuranone derivative. AOX is a key enzyme in energy metabolism of plants, fungi and T. brucei. It is essential in BSF and required to maintain the redox balance within glycosomes, a Trypanosomatid-specific organelle.

Crystal structure of mitochondrial Quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR or Complex II) from A. suum. This enzyme is a heterotetramer composed by flavoprotein (salmon color), iron-sulfur protein (white), large (purple) and small (orange) cytochrome b subunits. In the small intestine where oxygen concentration is extremely low, this enzyme catalyzes the last step in fumarate respiration and essential for adaptation to host environment. Inhibitors of QFR are active against the helminthes that lives in microaerophilic environment such as adult stage of A. suumHaemonchus contortus, and Dirofilaria immitis.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Indonesia
  • El Salvador

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Hartuti ED, Inaoka DK (Corresponding Author, CA), Komatsuya K, Miyazaki Y, Miller RJ, Xinying W, Sadikin M, Prabandari EE, Waluyo D, Kuroda M, Amalia E, Matsuo Y, Nugroho NB, Saimoto H, Pramisandi A, Watanabe YI, Mori M, Shiomi K, Balogun EO, Shiba T, Harada S, Nozaki T, Kita K. Biochemical studies of membrane bound Plasmodium falciparum mitochondrial L-malate:quinone oxidoreductase, a potential drug target. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2018 Mar;1859(3):191-200.
  2. Wang X, Inaoka DK (CA), Shiba T, Balogun EO, Allmann S, Watanabe YI, Boshart M, Kita K, Harada S. Expression, purification, and crystallization of type 1 isocitrate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Protein Expr Purif. 2017 Oct;138:56-62.
  3. Inaoka DK, Iida M, Hashimoto S, Tabuchi T, Kuranaga T, Balogun EO, Honma T, Tanaka A, Harada S, Nara T, Kita K, Inoue M. Design and synthesis of potent substrate-based inhibitors of the Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Bioorg Med Chem. 2017 Feb 15;25(4):1465-1470.
  4. Inaoka DK (CA), Iida M, Tabuchi T, Honma T, Lee N, Hashimoto S, Matsuoka S, Kuranaga T, Sato K, Shiba T, Sakamoto K, Balogun EO, Suzuki S, Nara T, Rocha JR, Montanari CA, Tanaka A, Inoue M, Kita K, Harada S. The Open Form Inducer Approach for Structure-Based Drug Design. PLoS One. 2016 Nov 28;11(11):e0167078.
  5. Inaoka DK, Shiba T, Sato D, Balogun EO, Sasaki T, Nagahama M, Oda M, Matsuoka S, Ohmori J, Honma T, Inoue M, Kita K, Harada S. Structural Insights into the Molecular Design of Flutolanil Derivatives Targeted for Fumarate Respiration of Parasite Mitochondria. Int J Mol Sci. 2015 Jul 7;16(7):15287-308.

Associate Professor Shingo Inoue

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

Ph.D. (Veterinary Medicine), National License of veterinarian

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/nekken/english/research/virology.html

Affiliation(s)

Department of Virology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (I.T.M), Nagasaki University

Background

  • February 2017: I became an associate professor of Department of Virology, I.T.M.
  • October 2009 to March 2017: I was dispatched to Kenya and work as a JICA expert on Virology (Arboviruses) at the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) for nearly 8 years (JICA-JSPS project and JICA-AMED SATREPS project).
  • December 2001: I joined to the Department of Virology, I.T.M. as an assistant professor.
  • April 1997 to November 2001: I Joined to St. Luke’s Medical Centre as a post-doctoral fellow. (Almost 3 years)
  • April 1997 to March 1999: I joined to the Department of Virology, I.T.M. as a post-doctoral fellow.
  • March 1997: I finished Ph.D. Course and got a degree at the Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Gifu University.
  • April 1989 to July 1991: I was dispatched to Zambia as a member of Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteers (JOCV). I joined to the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia for three years.
  • April 1988: I passed the National License Examination for Veterinarian.
  • March 1988: I finished MSc. Course and got a degree at the Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University.

Teaching

  1. Conducting the Virology Student Practices in the Training Course on Tropical Medicine (TTM) and the Master Course on Tropical Medicine (MTM)
  2. Supervising three Ph.D. Course students (two of them have got Ph.D. degrees) and 4 MSc. Course students (two of them have got MSc degrees) in Kenya.
  3. Instructing two Kenyan research students and a D.R. Congo research student on their virology and Molecular Biology essential experiments for preparation of their Ph.D. Course study.

Research

Development of diagnostics for mosquito-borne viral diseases (dengue virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Rift Valley fever virus, chikungunya virus, West Nile virus etc.)

The country/countries where you work currently

Kenya

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Adungo F, Yu F, Kamau D, Inoue S, Hayasaka D, Posadas HG, Sang R, Mwau M, Morita K, Development and Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to yellow fever virus and their application in antigen detection and IgM capture ELISA. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, on line 15 June 2016.1-38 (2016)
  2. Yoshikawa A, Nabeshima A, Inoue S, Agoh M, Morita K, Molecular and serological epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in a remote island of western Japan: an implication of JEV migration over the East China Sea., Tropical Medicine and Health, 44(8): 1-10 (2016)
  3. Inoue, S, Bundi M, Miring’u G, Muriithi B, Ashur S, Wandera E, Kathiiko C, Odoyo E, Kwallah AO, Galata A, Huka S, Shah M, Karama M, Kariuki S, Ichinose Y, Evaluation of a BSL-3 laboratory biosafety training program in Kenya. Journal of Biotechnology and Biosafety, 3(4): 288-296, (2015)
  4. Wasonga C, Inoue S, Rumberia, C,  Michuki, G, Kimotho JH, Ongus J, Sang R, Musila L, Genetic divergence of chikungunya virus plaque variants from the Comoros Island (2005). Virus Genes, 51(3): 323-328 (2015)
  5. Kwallah AO, Inoue S, Thairu-Mwangi AW, Kuttoh N, Morita K, Mwau M. Seroprevalence of Yellow Fever virus in selected health facilities in Western Kenya 2010–2012. Jpn J Infect Dis, 68: 230-234, (2015)

Message

Currently, I am working together with Kenyan students and young researchers for the development of diagnostics for mosquito borne viral diseases in Kenya. The highest priority criterion for me to choose research topics for my students and myself are based on the local needs in the tropics and it is also related to the development of diagnostics.

Associate Professor Vladimir Saenko

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

More than a 30-year experience and hands-on a broad variety of molecular laboratory techniques and instrumentations, experimental design and data analysis, laboratory management, instructorship and supervision.

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www-sdc.med.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/dhrc/index-e.html

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vladimir_Saenko

Affiliation(s)

Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University

Background

Education
1995/01–1996/11, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA1994/06, PhD (biochemistry and immunology), Rostov State Medical Institute, Rostov-on-Don, Russia1981/091987/02, M.S. [equivalent] in chemical engineering of biologically active substances, Lomonosov Institute of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow, Russia
Career

  • 2012/06present, Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology
    Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University
  • 2011/042012/06, Assistant professor, Department of Health Risk Control, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • 2002/042011/03, Assistant professor, Department of International Health and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
  • 2000/05–2002/03, Visiting Professor, Department of International Health and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
  • 1997/052000/04, Senior Scientist Molecular Biology division (Head), Department of Pathology, Medical Radiological research Center of RAMS, Obninsk, Russia
  • 1991/06–1997/04 , Scientist, Department of Radiation Biochemistry, Medical Radiological research Center of RAMS, Obninsk, Russia
  • 1987/031991/05, Junior Scientist, Department of Radiation Biochemistry, Medical Radiological Research Center of RAMS, Obninsk, Russia

Teaching

  • 2013 – present, “Radiation and thyroid cancer” (medical student course), Fukushima Medical University
  • 2006 – 2014, “Molecular Biology, Gene expression, Genomics and Biotechnology” (foreign student course), Nagasaki University
  • 2003 – 2012, “Basics of Molecular Biology” (medical student course) Nagasaki University

Research

Thyroid carcinogenesis, molecular carcinogenesis, radiation-induced carcinogenesis, molecular epidemiology, molecular diagnostics, radiation and cancer epidemiology, radiation biology, human genetics, molecular pathology. An author and coauthor of 117 peer reviewed articles, 2 books, 9 book chapters, 23 Professional societies’ publications, peer review service to 19 international journals, Member of Editorial board in 2 journals.

The country/countries where you work currently

Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Yamashita S, Suzuki S, Suzuki S, Shimura H, Saenko V. Lessons from Fukushima: Latest Findings of Thyroid Cancer after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident. Thyroid 2017 Dec 1. doi: 10.1089/thy.2017.0283. [Epub ahead of print] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28954584
  2. Bogdanova TI, Saenko V, Hirokawa M, Ito M, Zurnadzhy LY, Hayashi T, Rogounovitch TI, Miyauchi A, Tronko MD, Yamashita S. Comparative histopathological analysis of sporadic pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma from Japan and Ukraine. Endocr J 2017, 64(10):977-993. doi: 10.1507/endocrj.EJ17-0134. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/endocrj/64/10/64_EJ17-0134/_pdf/-char/en
  3. Matsuse M, Yabuta T, Saenko V, Hirokawa M, Nishihara E, Suzuki K, Yamashita S, Miyauchi A, Mitsutake N. TERT promoter mutations and Ki-67 labeling index as a prognostic marker of papillary thyroid carcinomas: combination of two independent factors. Scientific Rep 2017, 7:41752 doi: 10.1038/srep41752. PMID: 28150740. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5288691/
  4. Nikitski A, Rogounovitch T, Bychkov A, Takahashi M, Yoshiura K, Mitsutake N, Kawaguchi T, Matsuse M, Drozd V, Demidchik Yu, Nishihara E, Hirokawa M, Miyauchi A, Rubanovich A, Matsuda F, Yamashita S, Saenko V. Genotype analyses in the Japanese and Belarusian populations reveal independent effects of rs965513 and rs1867277 but do not support the role of FOXE1 polyalanine tract length in conferring risk for papillary thyroid carcinoma. Thyroid 2017, 27(2):224-235. doi: 10.1089/thy.2015.0541. http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/thy.2015.0541
  5. Takamura N, Orita M, Saenko V, Yamashita S, Nagataki S, Demidchik Yu. Radiation and risk of thyroid cancer: Fukushima and Chernobyl. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2016, 4(8):647. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213858716301127?via%3Dihub

Message

We are aimed at designing and conducting laboratory and epidemiological research into the contribution of inherited genetic variations and somatic genetic alterations to the etiology of human cancer and non-cancer diseases, particularly focusing on populations exposed to radiation in Chernobyl, Kazakhstan and Japan to improve public health through gaining new insights into gene-environmental interactions.

Associate Professor Chris Fook Sheng Ng

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

BSc, MAppStats, PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1025-0807
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Chris_Fook_Sheng_Ng
Contact Chris at https://tinyurl.com/yc3chlms

Affiliation(s)

School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University, Japan

Background

Chris received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (USA) (2002), a Master of Applied Statistics with distinction from the University of Malaya (Malaysia) (2005), and a PhD in Health Science from the University of Tokyo (Japan) (2011) for research on statistical method to measure the relative performance of post-market treatments in the absence of suitable controls. Following completion of his PhD, he went on to hold a postdoctoral position at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan) where he studied the health effects of ambient temperatures and air pollution in Japan. In 2013, he became a postdoctoral fellow under the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and expanded his work on environmental pollution and health to the developing countries in the tropics. He continued his work as an assistant professor at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University (Japan), from late 2015 until early 2018. From April 2018, he joined the School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health at the same university as an Associate Professor. He was a Rutherford Fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (United Kingdom) between August 2018 to January 2019.

Teaching

Chris teaches biostatistics at the School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health at Nagasaki University, and previously, the School of International Health at the University of Tokyo. He has previously organized and taught undergraduate courses in statistics, actuarial mathematics, and quantitative analysis.

Research

Chris is interested in environmental epidemiology and the related statistical methods. His research focuses on the assessment of human health risk associated with atmospheric exposures such as air pollution, ambient temperatures, airborne pollen, and intercontinental dust events. He is currently leading a project to measure the health impacts of landscape fires that affect the air quality of many Southeast Asian cities. He is involved in a project that investigates the associations of fine particulate matter, its chemical constituents and sources with the lung function of asthma patients. He is also leading a study to examine the forward displacement of daily mortality attributable to air temperatures in tropical setting.

Given his extensive training in applied statistics, Chris is also interested in the application of statistics in a multidisciplinary context involving other health fields and looks forward to working with researchers from different backgrounds.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Philippines
  • Vietnam

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Ng CFS, Boeckmann M, Ueda K, Zeeb H, Nitta H, Watanabe C, Honda Y. Heat-related mortality: effect modification and adaptation in Japan from 1972 to 2010. Global Environmental Change. 2016; 39: 234-243.
  2. Ng CFS, Stickley A, Konishi S, Watanabe C. Ambient air pollution and suicide in Tokyo, 2001-2011. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2016; 201: 194-202.
  3. Konishi S, Ng CFS, Stickley A, Nishihata S, Shinsugi C, Ueda K, Takami A, Watanabe C (2014). Particulate matter modifies the association between airborne pollen and daily medical consultations for pollinosis in Tokyo. Science of the Total Environment. 2014; 499: 125-132.
  4. Ng CFS, Ueda K, Takeuchi A, Nitta H, Konishi S, Bagrowicz R, Watanabe C, Takami A. Socio-geographic variation in the effects of heat and cold on daily mortality in Japan. Journal of Epidemiology. 2014; 24(1): 15-24.
  5. Ng CFS, Ueda K, Ono M, Nitta H, Takami A. Characterizing the effect of summer temperature on heat-stroke-related emergency ambulance dispatches in the Kanto area of Japan. International Journal of Biometeorology. 2014; 58(5): 941-948.

Message

In the digital age where data are collected faster and greater in quantity, strong quantitative skills are important to allow one to extract useful information from data. Statistics is central to this process. As you begin your journey with us, there will be opportunities to gain knowledge in statistical inference and develop skills in data analysis and interpretation. You will also be exposed to the data-driven approaches in epidemiology. I look forward to meeting students and researchers interested in utilizing these skills to improve health.

Associate Professor Ken Masuda

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD in Social Anthropology

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.linkedin.com/pub/ken-masuda/27/763/a83

Affiliation(s)

School of Global Humanities and Social Sciences, Nagasaki University

Background

Socio-anthropological study on history, socio-cultural dynamics, inter-ethnic conflict, modernization and development among the Banna in southern Ethiopia since 1993. Study on medical anthropology and medical pluralism since 2008. Study on population aging and elderly care since 2012.

Teaching

  • Teaching medical anthropology at TMGH and supervising master thesis at the International Health Development program. My students have carried out researches in Ethiopia, Kenya, Burkina Faso, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Cambodia.
  • Teaching Environmental anthropology at the Faculty of Environmental Studies and African Study at the School of Global Humanities and Social Sciences.

Research

I am currently involved in research teams on global aging, especially focusing on future aging and social welfare in Africa. Both qualitative and quantitative research on elderly life, health, care and social protection will be carried out in East Africa; Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Ethiopia (1993-Now)
  • Kenya (2012-Now)
  • Tanzania (2015-Now)
  • Nagasaki (2004- Now)

Message

I have been carrying out anthropological fieldwork on tradition and the modernization process in an agro-pastoral society, the Banna, in Ethiopia, northeast Africa since 1993. Watching a small remote society connect with, and getting swallowed by globalization reveals both positive and negative aspects of “development”. I explore the ideal relationship between traditional culture and society, modernization and development through the anthropological approach to international healthcare.

Associate Professor Mitsuaki Matsui

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

MD, MSc, PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

mmatsui@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

Background

I have been working in the field of maternal health. Pregnancy and childbirth are mostly physiological processes. In some cases, however, there are pathological aspects as well. Both physiology and pathology must be taken into account when considering maternal health. Unfortunately, only pathological phenomenon is focused on, as exemplified in the saying that “Every pregnancy is a risk”. Therefore, there is a huge misuse of medical interventions observed, both in developing and industrialized countries. We should strive to find an optimal point in between the two, keeping in mind that that point is variable. There is no “magic bullet” in the field of public health. We must think together how we can change this world.

Teaching

I am in charge of the two following modules

  • “Reproductive Health and Gender”Objective: to obtain necessary knowledge in order to control maternal morbidity and mortality and gender issues in developing countries.
  • “Program and Project Management”Objective: to obtain necessary knowledge and skill to manage public health program/projects in developing countries.

Research

  • “The impact of the improvement of the quality of care in maternity on maternal and neonatal health in health centers in Cambodia.”Outline – Evidence-based maternity and neonatal care is not well provided at health facilities in many developing countries, therefore the quality of care is substandard. However, international societies put immense pressure on the promotion of facility-based delivery regardless of the quality of care.  We carry out an evaluation of maternal and neonatal conditions during labor and the postpartum period and observe the changes after an intervention, which aims to improve the quality of care during maternity.
  • “Factors of chronic malnutrition among children under 2 years old in rural Cambodia.”Outline – Approximately one out of four children aged 24 months demonstrated being “underweight” (weight for age < -2 s.d.) in rural Cambodia. This rate progressively increased with the age of the children. This study employs a prospective design to observe the changes of weight related to age and its associated factors in rural Cambodia.

The country/countries where you work currently

Cambodia (capital – Phnom Penh, rural – Prey Veng province)

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Suto M, Takehara K, Misago C, Matsui M. Prevalence of perineal lacerations in women giving birth at midwife-led birth centers in Japan: A retrospective descriptive study. J midwife women health. in press(2015)
  2. Noguchi M, Matsui M, Osanai Y, Horikoshi Y, Takehara K, Misago C. Women-friendly childbirth experience Cambodia. J Int Health 29(4): 81.(2014)
  3. Matsui M, Sokhan U, Keth LS, Tung R.Equity gap in utilisation of emergency obstetric care service in Cambodia, from 2007 to 2009. Trop Med Int Health. 18(suppl 1): 187.(2013)
  4. Iwamoto A, Matsui M, Okabayashi H. Review of maternal, neonatal and child health integrated services in the southern four provinces in Lao PDR. Trop Med Int Health. 18(suppl 1): 186.(2013)
  5. Honda A, Randaoharison PG, Matsui M. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar. Reprod Health Matters. 19: 10-20.(2011)

Message

My research field is ‘maternal health’ and ‘quality of health care’. These topics

contribute to make the pregnancy and delivery process safer and to provide quality care to mothers, babies and family members.

Pregnancy and delivery are basically a physiological process, however, complications may occur, so maternal health should deal with both physiological and pathological issues. The means is not limited to medical technology. We should consider those who are giving birth for our future, therefore, our values and commitment towards self, others and society are always tested.

Associate Professor Richard Culleton

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD in malaria parasite genetics

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/malariaunit/Culleton_Lab/Home.html

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Richard_Culleton

LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardculleton/

Twitter

https://twitter.com/malariaunit?lang=en

Affiliation(s)

Malaria Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University

Background

  • BSc (hons) Biological Sciences — University of Edinburgh, Scotland 1996-2000
  • PhD Malaria Parasite Genetics — University of Edinburgh, Scotland 2001 -2004
  • Research Assistant – University of Edinburgh – 2000 -2001
  • Research Associate – University of Edinburgh – 2004 -2005
  • International Research Fellow – Osaka University – 2005 -2008
  • Assistant Professor – Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University – 2008 -2011
  • Associate Professor – Malaria Unit, ITM, Nagasaki University – 2011-Present

Research

My lab focuses on genetic and genomic approaches to identify the underlying genetic causes of medically important phenotypic differences between parasite strains. We use the rodent malaria parasites for some of these studies, but we are increasingly pursuing investigations involving the human malaria parasites in in vitro culture, and non-human primate malaria parasites such as Plasmodium cynomolgi in monkeys. We also work in malaria endemic countries on epidemiology related projects, including with P. falciparum and P. vivax in Africa, P. knowlesi and P. cynomolgi in Southeast Asia, and P. simium and P. brasilianum in South America. We are interested in ALL aspects of malariology.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Nigeria
  • Brazil

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Lu F, Culleton R, Zhang M, Ramaprasad A, von Seidlein L, Zhou H, Zhu G, Tang J, Liu Y, Wang W, Cao Y, Xu S, Gu Y, Li J, Zhang C, Gao Q, Menard D, Pain A, Yang H, Zhang Q & Cao J., Emergence of Indigenous Artemisinin Resistant Plasmodium falciparum in AfricaNew England Journal of Medicine 376 (10), 991-993 2017
  2. Abkallo H, Martinelli A, Inoue M, Ramaprasad A, Xangsayarath P, Gitaka J, Tang J, Yahata K, Zoungrana A, Mitaka H, Hunt P, Carter R, Kaneko O, Mustonen V, Illingworth CJR, Pain A & Culleton R, Rapid Identification of Genes Controlling Virulence and Immunity in Malaria ParasitesPLoS Pathogens 13(7): e1006447 2017
  3. Brasil P, Zalis MG, de Pina-Costa A, Siqueira AM, Bianco Junior C, Silva S, Areas ALL, Pelajo-Machado M, de Alvarenga DAM, Santelli ACFdS, Albuquerque HG, Cravo P, de Abreu FVS, Peterka CL, Zanini GM, Suarez-Mutis MC, Pissinatti A, Lourenco-de-Oliveira R, Brito CFAd, Ferreira-da-Cruz MdF, Culleton R, Daniel-Ribeiro CT. 2017. Outbreak of human malaria caused by Plasmodium simium in the Atlantic Forest in Rio de Janeiro: a molecular epidemiological investigationThe Lancet Global Health 5: e1038–46 2017
  4. Ansari HA, Templeton JT, Subudhi AK, Ramaprasad A, Tang J, Lu J, Naeem R, Oguike MC, Benavente ED, Clark TG, Sutherland CJ, Barnwell JW, Culleton R*, Cao J* and Pain A*. Genome-scale comparison of expanded gene families in Plasmodium ovale wallikeri and Plasmodium ovale curtisi with Plasmodium malariae and with other Plasmodium speciesInternational Journal for Parasitology 2016 Oct; 46 (11) :685-96 2016 2016
  5. Abkallo HM, Tangena JA, Tang J, Kobayashi N, Inoue M, Zoungrana A, Colegrave N, Culleton R, Within-host competition does not select for virulence in malaria parasites; studies with Plasmodium yoelii PLOS Pathogens 11(2): e1004628 2015

For an up to date publication list, please see:
https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Vkx8HZwAAAAJ&hl=en

メッセージ

The Malaria Unit at the Institute of Tropical Medicine is a dynamic and cosmopolitan laboratory specializing in the genetics and epidemiology of malaria. Although we take our scientific research very seriously, we endeavour to create a fun and relaxing environment for lab members, as we believe that science should be enjoyable and rewarding for the researcher.
We work on multiple disciplines within malariology, and try to accommodate each individual lab member’s research interests. We rely on a large network of international collaborators for the vast majority of our research projects, and currently have active partnerships with researchers in numerous regions including the UK, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Nigeria, Kenya, Thailand and elsewhere.
All research and lab life is conducted in English (with a smattering of Swahili, Welsh and American).
Our lab offers graduate students a relaxed and informal atmosphere in which to explore their own research interests with strong academic support and guidance if required.
Potential projects available with our lab include (but are not limited to); studies of inter-species interactions between malaria parasite strains and species within mice and mosquitoes; discovery of genes involved in drug resistance/ virulence/ strain-specific immunity in rodent malaria parasites through genetic crossing and whole genome sequencing; studies involving investigation of the conditions required for optimal vectorial capacity in mosquitoes; studies on the population genetics of P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale in field isolates from Nigeria.
We also strongly encourage potential graduate students to design their own research utilizing the resources of the Malaria Unit. These include the largest collection of rodent malaria parasite isolates in the world, a colony of A. stephensi mosquitoes in a state-of-the-art insectary for transmission experiments, and access to field isolates from our international collaborators.

Associate Professor Takayuki Wada

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

Ph. D. (Medicine)

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/newrect/japanese/member/wada.html

Affiliation(s)

Department of International Medicine, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University

Background

  • 1997/3 BSc Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
  • 1999/3 MSc Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
  • 1999/4 – 2009/3 Researcher, Department of Microbiology, Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences
  • 2009/4 – 2012/12 Senior Researcher, Department of Microbiology, Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences
  • 2013/1 – 2017/4 Assistant Professor, Department of International Health,
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University
  • 2017/5 – Associate Professor, Department of International Health,
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University

Research

Molecular Epidemiology: genomics, bioinformatics, geography
Zoonosis and host adaptation: diseases ecology, molecular evolution, One Health, conservation medicine

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Taiwan
  • Nepal

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. 和田崇之, 吉田志緒美, 柳井徳磨. 2017. ヒト,動物,環境をとりまく非結核性抗酸菌の浸淫状況と宿主適応. 日本臨床微生物学雑誌 27: 1-10.
  2. Seto, J., Wada, T., Suzuki, Y., Ikeda, T., Mizuta, K., Yamamoto, T., Ahiko, T. 2017. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission among elderly persons, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan, 2009–2015. Emerg Infect Dis 23: 448-455.(2017)
  3. Ban, E., Yoshida, Y., Wakushima, M., Wajima, T., Hamabata, T., Ichikawa, N., Abe, H., Horiguchi, Y., Hara-Kudo, Y., Kage-Nakadai, E., Yamamoto, T., Wada, T., Nishikawa, Y. 2015. Characterization of unstable pEntYN10 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) O169:H41. Virulence 6: 735–744.(2015)
  4. Wada, T., Iwamoto, T., Tamaru, A., Seto, J., Ahiko, T., Yamamoto, K., Hase, A., Maeda, S., Yamamoto, T. 2015. Clonality and micro-diversity of a nationwide spreading genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Japan. PLoS ONE 10: e0118495.(2015)
  5. Wada, T., Iwamoto, T., Maeda, S. 2009. Genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing family in East Asia revealed through refined population structure analysis. FEMS microbiology letters 291: 35-43.(2009)

Message

Not only tropical medicine, theoretical and basic sciences should be considered as an essential standpoint. It is recommended that Ph. D. candidates in our group keep an affinity to both applied and basic (logical) sciences flexibly, to confront own research purposes step by step.

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