Faculty

Professor Koji Maemura

Speciality / Research theme / Keywords
Cardiovascular Medicine
Programme director
Masters Programme

Qualifications

MD, PhD

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.med.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/junkanki/index.html

Affiliation(s)

  • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nagasaki University graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nagasaki University Hospital

Background

  • 1986-88 Resident, Internal Medicine, Tokyo University Hospital
  • 1988-90 Clinical Fellow, Cardiology, Mitsui Memorial Hospital
  • 1990-96 Clinical & Research Fellow, The 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tokyo
  • 1996 Instructor, The 3rd Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tokyo
  • 1996-2000 Research Fellow, Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Harvard School of Public Health
  • 2000 Research Fellow, Division of Cardiology, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • 2001-2008 Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tokyo
  • 2008- Professor, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Teaching

Cardiovascular Disease has been a major cause of death in developed countries. Also in developing countries, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension are increasing due to the change of lifestyle, resulting in the rapid increase of cardiovascular disease. Although infectious diseases has been the most important conventional health problem in developing countries, it will become very important to prevent and treat lifestyle-related diseases in the near future. I would like to learn how to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease, and how to educate people together with you.

Research

  • Previous studies reported that night shift workers had a high risk of ischemic heart disease, suggesting a close association between cardiovascular diseases and circadian rhythm. In addition, recent studies obtained from the genetically engineered mice with disrupted circadian rhythm have revealed that the circadian clock is closely related to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. We are investigating the biological relevance of the biological clock in the development of cardiovascular diseases and trying to develop chronotherapeutic approaches to the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
  • Recent studies have revealed that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mostly arises as a result of thrombotic coronary occlusion after the rupture of a vulnerable plaque. Thus, identifying vulnerable plaque before AMI is important to prevent AMI. We are searching blood biomarkers to easily detect the presence of vulnerable plaque.

The country/countries where you work currently

Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Ikeda S, Koga S, Yamagata Y, Eguchi M, Sato D, Muroya T, Yonekura T, Tsuneto A, Yoshimuta T, Koide Y, Kawano H, Maemura K. Comparison of the effects of edoxaban, an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor, on venous thromboembolism between patients with and without cancer. J Cardiol.2018; 72:120-127
  2. Nakashima H, Mashimo Y, Kurobe M, Muto S, Furudono S, Maemura K. Impact of Morning Onset on the Incidence of Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome and Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Acute Myocardial Infarction. Circ J. 2017;81:361-367.
  3. Takeda N, Maemura K. Circadian clock and the onset of cardiovascular events. Hypertens Res. 2016;39:383-90.
  4. Nakashima H, Kurobe M, Minami K, Furudono S, Uchida Y, Amenomori K, Nunohiro T, Takeshita S, Maemura K. Effects of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea on the clinical manifestations of plaque vulnerability and the progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care. 2015;4:75-84
  5. Koga S, Ikeda S, Miura M, Yoshida T, Nakata T, Koide Y, Kawano H, Maemura K. Imap-intravascular ultrasound radiofrequency signal analysis reflects plaque components of optical coherence tomography-derived thin-cap fibroatheroma. Circ J. 2015;79:2231-2237

Message

Cardiovascular Disease has been the major cause of death in developed countries, however the death rate has been decreasing due to preventive medicine and the development of new therapies. On the other hand, in developing countries, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension are increasing due to the change in lifestyle, resulting in a rapid increase in cardiovascular disease. Although infectious diseases have been the most important health problems conventionally in developing countries, it will become very important to prevent and treat lifestyle-related diseases in the near future. I would like to learn how to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease, and how to educate people together with you.

 

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