Faculty

Professor Shinjiro Hamano

Speciality / Research theme / Keywords
Parasitology
Programme director
Masters Programme

Qualifications

MD, PhD

Personal/work Web page addresses

Research gate or Linked-in account links

Affiliations

  • Department of Parasitology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN) Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, JAPAN
  • Nagasaki University Nairobi Research Station, NUITM-KEMRI Project, Nairobi, Kenya

Background

Shinjiro Hamano MD, PhD is a Professor of Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University from 2009. Dr. Hamano graduated in medicine and received a MD degree from Kumamoto University in 1993 and a PhD degree from Kyushu University, Fukuoka in 1999. Then, he has been studying host defense mechanisms against various protozoan and helminthic parasites in Kyushu University and Nagasaki University. His research interests are on tropical infectious diseases and host defense mechanism to microbes including parasites. During 2004 to 2006, he had visited University of Virginia and dedicated his time to elucidate the determinants for Entamoeba histolytica to establish the infection using animal model. Dr. Hamano and his colleagues elucidated the pathogenicity of Entamoeba moshkovskii and the role of newly identified heterodimeric cytokine IL-27 and its receptor WSX-1 in host defense to protozoan parasites. He has also engaged in field study about tropical infectious diseases in developing countries.

Teaching

  • Parasitic diseases are still a huge menace to human health and continue unabated in tropical areas under the conditions of poverty and the unique natural and social environments. Various kinds of parasites infect humans for long periods of time without killing them, giving rise to tremendous social and/or economic loss. We would like to help students develop deep insight into parasitic diseases and the surrounding factors from various points of view. The roles on TMGH courses is to show existing and new knowledge and to provide an enthusiastic environment for the future generation.
  • Parasitology, Neglected Tropical Diseases, Immunology

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Kenya
  • Bangladesh

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Inoue, M., Niki, M., Ozeki, Y., Nagi, S., Chadeka, E.A., Yamaguchi, T., Osada-Oka, M., Ono, K., Oda, T., Mwende, F., Kaneko, Y., Matsumoto, M., Kaneko, S., Ichinose, Y., Njenga, S.M., Hamano, S., Matsumoto, S.: High-density lipoprotein suppresses tumor necrosis factor alpha production by mycobacteria-infected human macrophages. Sci Rep. 2018; 8(1): 6736.
  2. Moriyasu, T., Nakamura, R., Deloer, S., Senba, M., Kubo, M., Inoue, M., *Culleton, R., *Hamano, S.: Schistosoma mansoni infection suppresses the growth of Plasmodium yoelii parasites in the liver and reduces gametocyte infectivity to mosquitoes. PLoS Negl. Trop. Dis. 2018; 12(1): e0006197.
  3. Shimokawa, C., Senba, M., Kobayashi, S., Kikuchi, M., Obi, S., Olia, A., Hamano, S., Hisaeda, H.: Intestinal inflammation-mediated clearance of amebic parasites is dependent on IFN-γ. J. Immunol. 2018; 200(3):1101-1109.
  4. Deloer, S., Nakamura, R., Kikuchi, M., Moriyasu, T., Kalenda, Y.D.J., Mohammed, E.S., Senba, M., Iwakura, Y., Yoshida, H., *Hamano, S.: IL-17A contributes to reducing IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and persistence of Entamoeba histolytica during intestinal amebiasis. Parasitol. Int. 2017; 66(6): 817-823.
  5. Chadeka, E.A., Nagi, S., Sunahara, T., Cheruiyot, N.B., Bahati, F., Ozeki, Y., Inoue, M., Osada-Oka, M., Okabe, M., Hirayama, Y., Changoma, M., Adachi, K., Mwende, F., Kikuchi, M., Nakamura, R., Dan Justin, Y.K., Kaneko, S., Hirayama, K., Shimada, M., Ichinose, Y., Njenga, S.M., Matsumoto, S., *Hamano, S.: Spatial distribution and risk factors of Schistosoma haematobium and hookworm infections among schoolchildren in Kwale, Kenya. PLoS Negl. Trop. Dis. 2017; 11(9):e0005872.

Message

Parasitic diseases are still a huge menace to human health and continue unabated in tropical areas under the conditions of poverty and the unique natural and social environments. Various kinds of parasites infect humans for long periods of time without killing them, giving rise to tremendous social and/or economic loss. We would like to help students develop deep insight into parasitic diseases and the surrounding factors from various points of view. The roles on TMGH courses is to show existing and new knowledge and to provide an enthusiastic environment for the future generation.

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