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Blog Archives

Associate Professor Mitsuaki Matsui

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

MD, MSc, PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

mmatsui@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

Background

I have been working in the field of maternal health. Pregnancy and childbirth are mostly physiological processes. In some cases, however, there are pathological aspects as well. Both physiology and pathology must be taken into account when considering maternal health. Unfortunately, only pathological phenomenon is focused on, as exemplified in the saying that “Every pregnancy is a risk”. Therefore, there is a huge misuse of medical interventions observed, both in developing and industrialized countries. We should strive to find an optimal point in between the two, keeping in mind that that point is variable. There is no “magic bullet” in the field of public health. We must think together how we can change this world.

Teaching

I am in charge of the two following modules

  • “Reproductive Health and Gender”Objective: to obtain necessary knowledge in order to control maternal morbidity and mortality and gender issues in developing countries.
  • “Program and Project Management”Objective: to obtain necessary knowledge and skill to manage public health program/projects in developing countries.

Research

  • “The impact of the improvement of the quality of care in maternity on maternal and neonatal health in health centers in Cambodia.”Outline – Evidence-based maternity and neonatal care is not well provided at health facilities in many developing countries, therefore the quality of care is substandard. However, international societies put immense pressure on the promotion of facility-based delivery regardless of the quality of care.  We carry out an evaluation of maternal and neonatal conditions during labor and the postpartum period and observe the changes after an intervention, which aims to improve the quality of care during maternity.
  • “Factors of chronic malnutrition among children under 2 years old in rural Cambodia.”Outline – Approximately one out of four children aged 24 months demonstrated being “underweight” (weight for age < -2 s.d.) in rural Cambodia. This rate progressively increased with the age of the children. This study employs a prospective design to observe the changes of weight related to age and its associated factors in rural Cambodia.

The country/countries where you work currently

Cambodia (capital – Phnom Penh, rural – Prey Veng province)

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Suto M, Takehara K, Misago C, Matsui M. Prevalence of perineal lacerations in women giving birth at midwife-led birth centers in Japan: A retrospective descriptive study. J midwife women health. in press(2015)
  2. Noguchi M, Matsui M, Osanai Y, Horikoshi Y, Takehara K, Misago C. Women-friendly childbirth experience Cambodia. J Int Health 29(4): 81.(2014)
  3. Matsui M, Sokhan U, Keth LS, Tung R.Equity gap in utilisation of emergency obstetric care service in Cambodia, from 2007 to 2009. Trop Med Int Health. 18(suppl 1): 187.(2013)
  4. Iwamoto A, Matsui M, Okabayashi H. Review of maternal, neonatal and child health integrated services in the southern four provinces in Lao PDR. Trop Med Int Health. 18(suppl 1): 186.(2013)
  5. Honda A, Randaoharison PG, Matsui M. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar. Reprod Health Matters. 19: 10-20.(2011)

Message

My research field is ‘maternal health’ and ‘quality of health care’. These topics

contribute to make the pregnancy and delivery process safer and to provide quality care to mothers, babies and family members.

Pregnancy and delivery are basically a physiological process, however, complications may occur, so maternal health should deal with both physiological and pathological issues. The means is not limited to medical technology. We should consider those who are giving birth for our future, therefore, our values and commitment towards self, others and society are always tested.

Associate Professor Richard Culleton

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD in malaria parasite genetics

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/malariaunit/Culleton_Lab/Home.html

Research gate or Linked-in account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Richard_Culleton

LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardculleton/

Twitter

https://twitter.com/malariaunit?lang=en

Affiliation(s)

Malaria Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University

Background

  • BSc (hons) Biological Sciences — University of Edinburgh, Scotland 1996-2000
  • PhD Malaria Parasite Genetics — University of Edinburgh, Scotland 2001 -2004
  • Research Assistant – University of Edinburgh – 2000 -2001
  • Research Associate – University of Edinburgh – 2004 -2005
  • International Research Fellow – Osaka University – 2005 -2008
  • Assistant Professor – Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University – 2008 -2011
  • Associate Professor – Malaria Unit, ITM, Nagasaki University – 2011-Present

Research

My lab focuses on genetic and genomic approaches to identify the underlying genetic causes of medically important phenotypic differences between parasite strains. We use the rodent malaria parasites for some of these studies, but we are increasingly pursuing investigations involving the human malaria parasites in in vitro culture, and non-human primate malaria parasites such as Plasmodium cynomolgi in monkeys. We also work in malaria endemic countries on epidemiology related projects, including with P. falciparum and P. vivax in Africa, P. knowlesi and P. cynomolgi in Southeast Asia, and P. simium and P. brasilianum in South America. We are interested in ALL aspects of malariology.

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Nigeria
  • Brazil

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Lu F, Culleton R, Zhang M, Ramaprasad A, von Seidlein L, Zhou H, Zhu G, Tang J, Liu Y, Wang W, Cao Y, Xu S, Gu Y, Li J, Zhang C, Gao Q, Menard D, Pain A, Yang H, Zhang Q & Cao J., Emergence of Indigenous Artemisinin Resistant Plasmodium falciparum in AfricaNew England Journal of Medicine 376 (10), 991-993 2017
  2. Abkallo H, Martinelli A, Inoue M, Ramaprasad A, Xangsayarath P, Gitaka J, Tang J, Yahata K, Zoungrana A, Mitaka H, Hunt P, Carter R, Kaneko O, Mustonen V, Illingworth CJR, Pain A & Culleton R, Rapid Identification of Genes Controlling Virulence and Immunity in Malaria ParasitesPLoS Pathogens 13(7): e1006447 2017
  3. Brasil P, Zalis MG, de Pina-Costa A, Siqueira AM, Bianco Junior C, Silva S, Areas ALL, Pelajo-Machado M, de Alvarenga DAM, Santelli ACFdS, Albuquerque HG, Cravo P, de Abreu FVS, Peterka CL, Zanini GM, Suarez-Mutis MC, Pissinatti A, Lourenco-de-Oliveira R, Brito CFAd, Ferreira-da-Cruz MdF, Culleton R, Daniel-Ribeiro CT. 2017. Outbreak of human malaria caused by Plasmodium simium in the Atlantic Forest in Rio de Janeiro: a molecular epidemiological investigationThe Lancet Global Health 5: e1038–46 2017
  4. Ansari HA, Templeton JT, Subudhi AK, Ramaprasad A, Tang J, Lu J, Naeem R, Oguike MC, Benavente ED, Clark TG, Sutherland CJ, Barnwell JW, Culleton R*, Cao J* and Pain A*. Genome-scale comparison of expanded gene families in Plasmodium ovale wallikeri and Plasmodium ovale curtisi with Plasmodium malariae and with other Plasmodium speciesInternational Journal for Parasitology 2016 Oct; 46 (11) :685-96 2016 2016
  5. Abkallo HM, Tangena JA, Tang J, Kobayashi N, Inoue M, Zoungrana A, Colegrave N, Culleton R, Within-host competition does not select for virulence in malaria parasites; studies with Plasmodium yoelii PLOS Pathogens 11(2): e1004628 2015

For an up to date publication list, please see:
https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Vkx8HZwAAAAJ&hl=en

メッセージ

The Malaria Unit at the Institute of Tropical Medicine is a dynamic and cosmopolitan laboratory specializing in the genetics and epidemiology of malaria. Although we take our scientific research very seriously, we endeavour to create a fun and relaxing environment for lab members, as we believe that science should be enjoyable and rewarding for the researcher.
We work on multiple disciplines within malariology, and try to accommodate each individual lab member’s research interests. We rely on a large network of international collaborators for the vast majority of our research projects, and currently have active partnerships with researchers in numerous regions including the UK, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Nigeria, Kenya, Thailand and elsewhere.
All research and lab life is conducted in English (with a smattering of Swahili, Welsh and American).
Our lab offers graduate students a relaxed and informal atmosphere in which to explore their own research interests with strong academic support and guidance if required.
Potential projects available with our lab include (but are not limited to); studies of inter-species interactions between malaria parasite strains and species within mice and mosquitoes; discovery of genes involved in drug resistance/ virulence/ strain-specific immunity in rodent malaria parasites through genetic crossing and whole genome sequencing; studies involving investigation of the conditions required for optimal vectorial capacity in mosquitoes; studies on the population genetics of P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale in field isolates from Nigeria.
We also strongly encourage potential graduate students to design their own research utilizing the resources of the Malaria Unit. These include the largest collection of rodent malaria parasite isolates in the world, a colony of A. stephensi mosquitoes in a state-of-the-art insectary for transmission experiments, and access to field isolates from our international collaborators.

Associate Professor Takayuki Wada

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

Ph. D. (Medicine)

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/newrect/japanese/member/wada.html

Affiliation(s)

Department of International Medicine, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University

Background

  • 1997/3 BSc Faculty of Science, Kyoto University
  • 1999/3 MSc Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University
  • 1999/4 – 2009/3 Researcher, Department of Microbiology, Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences
  • 2009/4 – 2012/12 Senior Researcher, Department of Microbiology, Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences
  • 2013/1 – 2017/4 Assistant Professor, Department of International Health,
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University
  • 2017/5 – Associate Professor, Department of International Health,
    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University

Research

Molecular Epidemiology: genomics, bioinformatics, geography
Zoonosis and host adaptation: diseases ecology, molecular evolution, One Health, conservation medicine

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Taiwan
  • Nepal

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. 和田崇之, 吉田志緒美, 柳井徳磨. 2017. ヒト,動物,環境をとりまく非結核性抗酸菌の浸淫状況と宿主適応. 日本臨床微生物学雑誌 27: 1-10.
  2. Seto, J., Wada, T., Suzuki, Y., Ikeda, T., Mizuta, K., Yamamoto, T., Ahiko, T. 2017. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission among elderly persons, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan, 2009–2015. Emerg Infect Dis 23: 448-455.(2017)
  3. Ban, E., Yoshida, Y., Wakushima, M., Wajima, T., Hamabata, T., Ichikawa, N., Abe, H., Horiguchi, Y., Hara-Kudo, Y., Kage-Nakadai, E., Yamamoto, T., Wada, T., Nishikawa, Y. 2015. Characterization of unstable pEntYN10 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) O169:H41. Virulence 6: 735–744.(2015)
  4. Wada, T., Iwamoto, T., Tamaru, A., Seto, J., Ahiko, T., Yamamoto, K., Hase, A., Maeda, S., Yamamoto, T. 2015. Clonality and micro-diversity of a nationwide spreading genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Japan. PLoS ONE 10: e0118495.(2015)
  5. Wada, T., Iwamoto, T., Maeda, S. 2009. Genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing family in East Asia revealed through refined population structure analysis. FEMS microbiology letters 291: 35-43.(2009)

Message

Not only tropical medicine, theoretical and basic sciences should be considered as an essential standpoint. It is recommended that Ph. D. candidates in our group keep an affinity to both applied and basic (logical) sciences flexibly, to confront own research purposes step by step.

Assistant professor Tomohiro Koga

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Medicine (Nagasaki University)
  •  Medical license

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.med.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/intmed-1/

Research gate account links

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tomohiro_Koga

Affiliation(s)

  • Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Division of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan
  • Nagasaki university hospital, Medical education development center

Background

  • April 2005 – March 2009 National Organization Hospital Organization Nagasaki Medical Center
  • April 2009 – May 2011 Nagasaki University Hospital Department of rheumatology
  • June 2011 – February 2014 Harvard Medical University (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Rheumatology Division, Dr. Tsokos Lab), research fellow
  • March 2014 – November 2016 Nagasaki University Hospital Medical Education Development Center, assistant professor
  • December 2016 – present Center for Bioinformatics and Molecular Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, assistant professor (the Leading Initiative for Excellent Young Researchers of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology)

Teaching

Diagnostics: practical training on collagen diseasesEducation for medical intern

Research

  • Studies on T cell signaling in autoimmune diseases
  • Research on gene analysis and cytokine analysis in autoinflammatory diseases

The country/countries where you work currently

Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Umeda M, Koga T (corresponding author), Ichinose K, Igawa T, Sato T, Takatani A, Shimizu T, Fukui S, Nishino A, Horai Y, Hirai Y, Kawashiri SY, Iwamoto N, Aramaki T, Tamai M, Nakamura H, Yamamoto K, Abiru N, Origuchi T, Ueki Y, Kawakami A. CD4+ CD52lo T-cell expression contributes to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Clin Immunol. 2017 Oct 13. pii: S1521-6616(17)30567-3.
  2. Koga T, Kawashiri SY, Migita K, Sato S, Umeda M, Fukui S, Nishino A, Nonaka F, Iwamoto N, Ichinose K, Tamai M, Nakamura H, Origuchi T, Ueki Y, Masumoto J, Agematsu K, Yachie A, Eguchi K, Kawakami A. Comparison of serum inflammatory cytokine concentrations in familial Mediterranean fever and rheumatoid arthritis patients. Scand J Rheumatol. 2017 Sep 2:1-3. doi: 10.1080/03009742.2017.1363281.
  3. Koga T, Otomo K, Mizui M, Yoshida N, Umeda M, Ichinose K, Kawakami A, Tsokos GC. Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase IV Facilitates the Recruitment of Interleukin-17-Producing Cells to Target Organs Through the CCR6/CCL20 Axis in Th17 Cell-Driven Inflammatory Diseases. Arthritis Rheumatol. 2016 Aug;68(8):1981-8. doi: 10.1002/art.39665.
  4. Otomo K, Koga T (co-first author), Mizui M, Yoshida N, Kriegel C, Bickerton S, Fahmy TM, Tsokos GC. Cutting Edge: Nanogel-Based Delivery of an Inhibitor of CaMK4 to CD4+ T Cells Suppresses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Lupus-like Disease in Mice. J Immunol. 2015 Dec 15;195(12):5533-7. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1501603.
  5. Koga T, Hedrich CM, Mizui M, Yoshida N, Otomo K, Lieberman LA, Rauen T, Crispín JC, Tsokos GC. CaMK4-dependent activation of AKT/mTOR and CREM-α underlies autoimmunity-associated Th17 imbalance. J Clin Invest. 2014 May;124(5):2234-45. doi: 10.1172/JCI73411. Epub 2014 Mar 25.

Message

As a clinician with researchers’ eyes, we are conducting research that can contribute to practical use for patients based on clinical questions as a rheumatologist. In order to solve the unmet medical needs of autoimmune diseases and autoinflammatory diseases which are regarded as rare intractable diseases, we are looking for fellows who can study together.

Assistant Professor Toshihiko Sunahara

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

PhD

Background

Ecology

Teaching

TMGH Master course, Three-month Tropical Medicine course

Research

Population ecology of mosquitoes

The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Sunahara T. 2019. Effects of filling catch basins with Mosquito Eliminating Mat on mosquito populations. Medical Entomology and Zoology (in press) [Japanese]
  2. Sunahara T. 2019. Extremely high biting densities of Aedes albopictus (Skuse)(Diptera: Culicidae) at a university campus in Nagasaki, Japan. Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases (in press)
  3. Imanishi N, Higa Y, Teng HJ, Sunahara T, Minakawa N. 2018. Identification of Three Distinct Groups of  in Japan by Morphological and Genetic Analyses. Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases 71(6): 427-435.
  4. Sunahara T 2018. Simulation Study of the Effects of Host Availability on Bite Rate of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) and Risk of Dengue Outbreaks in Non-Endemic Areas. Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases 71(1): 28-32.
  5. Chadeka EA, Nagi S, Sunahara T, Cheruiyot NB, Bahati F, Ozeki Y, Inoue M, Osada-Oka M, Okabe M, Hirayama Y, Changoma M, Adachi K, Mwende F, Kikuchi M, Nakamura R, Kalenda YDJ, Kaneko S, Hirayama K, Shimada M, Ichinose Y, Njenga SM, Matsumoto S, Hamano S. 2017. Spatial distribution and risk factors of Schistosoma haematobium and hookworm infections among schoolchildren in Kwale, Kenya. PLoS Neglected Tropical Disieses 11(9): e0005872

Message

Read the literatures related with your interest. Understand the scientific background and specify what has not been done (although it is important). Establish your study question and think of the methods to solve it. Then, 70% of your research is completed. These steps before experiments / field study is very important for your research.

Assistant professor Michiko Toizumi

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

  • MD
  • MTM
  • PhD

Personal/work Web page addresses

http://www.tm.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/pediatric/

Affiliation(s)

Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University

Background

I graduated from Kumamoto University Medical School, Japan and then had worked as a pediatrician for 8 years. Following that, I had studied tropical medicine and pediatric infectious diseases in the Master course of Tropical Medicine and in the Doctoral course in Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University. After I received my PhD, I joined the Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University as an assistant professor in 2015.

Teaching

Facilitator of Epidemiology-Statistics Course in School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University

Research

Studies on pediatric infectious diseases in Vietnam:

Acute respiratory infections (incidence, viral/bacterial pathogens, risk factors)

Congenital infections (e.g.,rubella, CMV, Zika) and the effect on child development

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine reduced dosing trial

The country/countries where you work currently

Vietnam

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Michiko Toizumi, Motoi Suzuki, Hien Anh Thi Nguyen, Minh Nhat Le, Koya Ariyoshi, Hiroyuki Moriuchi, Masahiro Hashizume, Duc Anh Dang, and Lay-Myint Yoshida
    Viral Acute Respiratory Illnesses in Young Infants Increase the Risk of Respiratory Readmission
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, in press
  2. Imai, C., Toizumi, M., Hall, L., Lambert, S., Halton, K., Merollini, K.
    A systematic review and meta-analysis of the direct epidemiological and economic effects of seasonal influenza vaccination on healthcare workers
    (2018) PLoS ONE, 13 (6), art. no. e0198685
  3. Toizumi, M., Nguyen, G.T.H., Motomura, H., Nguyen, T.H., Pham, E., Kaneko, K.-I., Uematsu, M., Nguyen, H.A.T., Dang, D.A., Hashizume, M., Yoshida, L.-M., Moriuchi, H.
    Sensory defects and developmental delay among children with congenital rubella syndrome
    (2017) Scientific Reports, 7, art. no. 46483.
    https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85017447271&doi=10.1038%2fsrep46483&partnerID=40&md5=e4958d50959615e2658576c987ed1bc9
    DOI: 10.1038/srep46483
  4. Yoshihara, K., Le, M.N., Okamoto, M., Wadagni, A.C.A., Nguyen, H.A., Toizumi, M., Pham, E., Suzuki, M., Nguyen, A.T.T., Oshitani, H., Ariyoshi, K., Moriuchi, H., Hashizume, M., Dang, D.A., Yoshida, L.-M.
    Association of RSV-A ON1 genotype with Increased Pediatric Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Vietnam
    (2016) Scientific Reports, 6, art. no. 27856.
    https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84975155668&doi=10.1038%2fsrep27856&partnerID=40&md5=762505b0e9f3febd2b4412a119cb6ba8
    DOI: 10.1038/srep27856
  5. Yamanashi, H., Ngoc, M.Q., Van Huy, T., Suzuki, M., Tsujino, A., Toizumi, M., Takahashi, K., Thiem, V.D., Anh, D.D., Anh, N.T.H., Tho, L.H., Maeda, T., Cox, S.E., Yoshida, L.-M., Ariyoshi, K.
    Population-based incidence rates of first-ever stroke in central Vietnam
    (2016) PLoS ONE, 11 (8), art. no. e0160665.
    https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84983475347&doi=10.1371%2fjournal.pone.0160665&partnerID=40&md5=ffb48a6308a404bd39460f8ddd42f7ab
    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0160665

Message

Please join us if you are interested in our researches on pediatric infectious diseases!

Assistant Professor Bhim Gopal Dhoubhadel

    COURSES: YEAR:

Qualifications

MBBS, MTM, PhD

Research gate or Linked-in account links

Twitter account name

https://twitter.com/bhim_gopal

Background

I received my medical degree from BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Nepal in 2005 and then worked for three years in paediatric hospitals in Nepal followed by one year in a refugee camp for Somali and Ethiopian refugees under UNHCR in Djibouti. Between 2010-11, I completed the Master of Tropical Medicine (MTM) programme in the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University and then a PhD in the Department of Clinical Medicine of the same institute between 2011 and 2014. In 2014, I was a Fellow of the Global (Health) Leadership Program at the University of Tokyo and completed an internship at the headquarters of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva. My research interests are infectious diseases, child health and development of new diagnostic assays. In 2014, we established a new diagnostic assay for serotyping the pneumococcus (a major cause of pneumonia). The assay can identify vaccine serotypes easily and conveniently at a relatively low cost and has been applied in studies in Japan, Vietnam and Afghanistan.

Teaching

At TMGH, I teach master students about essential skills and tropical medicine (clinical bacteriology and molecular diagnostic technique), and organize and facilitate clinical case discussion between the students and doctors in San Lazaro Hospital (Philippians), Bach Mai Hospital (Vietnam) and National Center for Global Health and Medicine (Japan).

Previously I taught advanced paediatric life support (APLS) course to junior medical doctors in Siddhartha Children and Women Hospital, Nepal and child health and management of malnutrition to medical and nursing staffs in Djibouti.

Research

I have studied the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes in hospital admitted children and adults in Japan, Vietnam and Afghanistan with a particular focus on the estimation of pneumococcal vaccine coverage.

After I participated in relief efforts following the earthquake in 2015 in Nepal, we are developing a research collaboration with Siddhi Memorial Hospital, Bhaktapur (http://smf.org.np). The focus is on childhood infectious diseases and malnutrition. We are supporting hospital disease surveillance and have conducted nutritional assessments of children who were displaced by the earthquake and living under temporary shelters.

At TMGH, we are establishing new diagnostic assays for typhoid fever based on real-time PCR and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). We plan to evaluate these assays in Nepal and other field sites.

bhim_1
Picture1:Disease surveillance in Siddhi Memorial Hospital, Bhaktapur, Nepal.


bhim_2
Picture 2: Nutritional assessment of children in temporary shelters in Bhaktapur after 2015 earthquake in Nepal.


The country/countries where you work currently

  • Japan
  • Nepal
  • Afghanistan

Five MOST IMPORTANT/INTERESTING recent publications

  1. Kakiuchi S, Suzuki M, Dhoubhadel BG, Furumoto A, Ito H, Kei Matsuki, Tsuchihashi Y, Asoh N, Yasunami M, Ariyoshi K, Morimoto K, Adult Pneumonia Study Group-Japan (2018). Accuracy of high-throughput nanofluidic PCR-based pneumococcal serotyping and quantification assays using sputum samples for diagnosing vaccine serotype pneumococcal pneumonia: analyses by composite diagnostic standards and Bayesian latent class models, J Clin Microbiol.
  2. Shrestha D, Dhoubhadel BG, Parry CM, Prajapati B, Ariyoshi K, Mahaseth C (2017). Predicting deaths in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit in Nepal, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg.
  3. Zabihullah R, Dhoubhadel BG, Rauf RA, Shafiq SA, Suzuki M, Watanabe K, Yoshida LM, Yasunami M, Zabihullah S, Parry CM, Mirwais R, Ariyoshi K (2017). Risk for death among children with pneumonia, Afghanistan, Emerg Infect Dis.
  4. Suzuki M, Dhoubhadel BG, Ishifuji T, Yasunami M, Yaegashi M, Asoh N, Ishida M, Hamaguchi S, Aoshima M, Ariyoshi K, Morimoto K; Adult Pneumonia Study Group-Japan (APSG-J) (2016). Serotype-specific effectiveness of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine against pneumococcal pneumonia among adults aged ≥65 years: a multicenter prospective test-negative design study, Lancet Infect Dis.
  5. Dhoubhadel BG, Yasunami M, Nguyen HA, Suzuki M, Vu TH, Thi Thuy Nguyen A, Dang DA, Yoshida LM, Ariyoshi K (2014) Bacterial Load of Pneumococcal Serotypes Correlates with Their Prevalence and Multiple Serotypes is Associated with Acute Respiratory Infections, PLoS One.

Link to all publications

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/1pMFjL8tdMn55/bibliography/40287257/public/?sort=date&direction=ascending

Message

Clinical infectious diseases, child health and vaccination are some of the inter-related exciting fields of global health.
We have been working in these areas and found that there are lots to discover, learn and contribute on these topics globally.
We hope you will find them interesting and contribute while you study here at TMGH. Welcome!

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